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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 10:41 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 18, 2003 11:59 am
Posts: 220
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
I'm at 47-50* after an hour of very light usage - 3% CPU, with a cooler ambient than 23*.


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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 3:09 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2009 1:06 am
Posts: 47
tramall wrote:
For i3-3220T - 59*C (ambient 23*C-24*C)- 100% cpu - that's LinX at standard settings,we got similar temps when we put celeron g1610. Idle drops to about 39-40*C. Having 50 is not bad(assuming it is during heavy use). We also compared akasa's thermal compound given with the case and it was surprisingly good, compared to MX-2(1-2 degrees difference).



Ice Tea wrote:
Ice Tea wrote:
Anyone using the thermal paste that came with the Euler?


Well to answer my own question i've not noticed any real difference in load and idle temps between Arctic Silver 5 and the White stuff that comes with the Euler.

Maybe it's because i've only used 35w CPUs and would need more heat to notice?


Glad to hear i'm not the only one that didn't see much difference.Shame they don't say what they are using but it doesn't seem to be the cheap rubbish stuff you normally get for free with computer items.


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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2013 2:19 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2003 4:40 pm
Posts: 23
Location: UK
Just thought I'd add my experience with this case.

I wanted to build the most powerful setup I could, so I tried an i7-3770S (65W).

But, with this CPU at full blast, the temperatures got too hot and the CPU started reducing it's speed (intel's utility says it wasn't throttling but it was dropping the speed down to 3.1Ghz). Also the case became too hot to touch.

Deciding the CPU was probably just a little much for the case to cool, I have installed an i3-3220T. Even maxed out, the case, whilst hot, is not untouchable and the CPU never cuts/throttles the speed.

Whilst not quad-core it's nice to have a powerful system (built with the DH61AG) with no fan noise at all... 8)


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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 10:32 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 30, 2013 9:54 pm
Posts: 2
Hi gents, I assembled a:

-Akasa Euler with a
-DQ77KB board,
-16GB RAM
-and I thought an I7-3770T (45W TDP) would be a good idea.

Not so!

If I switch the machine on and leave it sitting at idle (Win8), the temperatures (AIDA64) will rise slowly and after about one hour (Zero to 1% CPU load !?!) they steady out at:
- CPU cores --> 62 C degrees
- DIMM --> 64 C degrees
- PCH --> 86 C degrees

The temps are confirmed by two other programs.
Also the complete case (top, bottom, sides - everywhere!!) is so hot that you can not lift it with your bare hand (I am guessing somewhere between 50 and 60 degrees). So clearly the temperature transfer between CPU and heat-sink/case works as advertised, but there is just too much heat generated by the CPU.

If I put a bit of stress on the system (20% CPU load), the CPU temps go to around 72 degrees C and the rest of the system just follows.
When the DIMM reached 70 degrees and PCH reached 92 degrees I chickened out and shut it down. I could look at re-seating the heat sink for the PCH (???) but in any case the whole rig is going to burn a hole into my desk with a bit of load on the system.

So unfortunately I wasted around 300.- bucks on a 45 W TDP processor that should have worked nicely.

Anybody any ideas????


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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2013 5:43 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2003 4:40 pm
Posts: 23
Location: UK
The i7-3770S is definitely too much for the case, under load. I hoped the 3770T might be the maximum one could use in the case, and therefore have quad core, but alas it seems not... It would appear that for IvyBridge, the maximum is dual-core..

I settled on the dual-core i3-3220T and it gets nice and toasty under load but not fry-an-egg hot..
So, I love my resultant PC; truly silent with plenty of grunt for most tasks...


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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 6:32 am 
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I swapped the I7-3770t out and put an I3-3220t in and that definitely runs cooler.
It is still warmer than in the review here (http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1321-page4.html), but acceptable.

Even with light use (max 5% CPU), the whole case is still getting quite warm (I am guessing between 45-50 degrees) after 2 hours, but at least I am not burning my fingers anymore.

The one thing that worries me however is the PCH temperature reported by AIDA64.
Most times it is around 30 degrees above the CPU temp - for example after around 4 hours of light use (room temp around 30 degrees) I get:

cpu: 52 degrees
dimm:60 degrees
VRM: 60 degrees
SSD: 53 degrees
PCH: 85 degrees !!!!!!!!

With 50 % load the PCH is still heading towards 90 degrees which is quite high (maximum quoted in the DQ77KB spec is 104 degrees).

Can somebody please check if the PCH in their system is around the same???

Thanks!


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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 12:17 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 18, 2013 11:36 am
Posts: 1
Hi all!

My configuration:

- DQ77KB
- i3 3225
- 4 GB RAM
- SSD msata
- Akasa Euler

Temperatures registered on BIOS:

- Idle - CPU 45"C; Chipset 60"C
- After 2h length DVDRip video CPU 55"C; Chipset 81"C

So I 'm going to reduce the temperature of chipset with a brass pin like at photo http://d-h.st/HzW


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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Tue Nov 12, 2013 8:12 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2012 1:28 pm
Posts: 4
Location: Northern California
Quote:
Can somebody please check if the PCH in their system is around the same???


I know this thread is kind of old, but maybe this will be helpful.

I actually am using a DH61AG motherboard, but had the same problem with my PCH temperature getting really high even at idle, like mid-80s. I removed the PCH heatsink, cleaned off the stock thermal pad, and replaced it with a little AS5, and it the temperatures have improved to low-70s. Might be worth a try.


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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Sun Dec 15, 2013 8:22 am 
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Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2003 10:28 am
Posts: 72
rotor wrote:
I just assembled a DQ77KB + Akasa Euler system over the weekend (in large part thanks to Mike's review and this forum topic), and I have very mixed feelings about the Euler. On the one hand, it has a nice appearance, feels well made, and it does seem to do the job (the case gets notably warm after a period of "activity" -- installing ESXi and building a few VMs). However, I am very un-impressed with the engineering. There are 10 points of contact between the case and the motherboard (4 screws in the corners of the motherboard, 4 nuts around the heatsink, the heatsink itself with the CPU, and the rear edge of the motherboard with the I/O shield), and the alignment is just not even close! It is essential for the CPU to be absolutely square with the heatsink, and if you try to screw down the corners of the motherboard, or if you use the I/O shield, then the CPU is *not* square with the heatsink, and that is a catastrophic design/manufacturing fault. The only way of getting the CPU perfectly aligned with the heatsink is to *only* use the 4 nuts around the heatsink, and to *not* use either the corner screws or the rear I/O shield.

User Regis reported this same problem, and provided a diagram that perfectly illustrates the problem: viewtopic.php?p=569291#p569291

Other user reports:

- MikeC never installed the I/O shield
- piglover says I/O shield lines up fine
- Aluminum has two of these, with no fit problems

My theory is that both piglover and Aluminum might be a little bit shocked if they check how much contact there is between the CPU and the heatsink block on their systems. If you use a bright torch, you can roughly see what the alignment is by peering through one of the side holes (the one furthest from the heatsink).

As long as you don't have TIM (heatsink goop) applied, it's easy to rock the motherboard on the different contact points (without any screws) to get a good idea of what touches where. Without the I/O shield, if you ensure the CPU is square with the heatsink (you can rock the motherboard and feel when the CPU is flat against the heatsink), the 4 corners of the board still don't come up flat against the posts; in most cases you have to push down on the corner of the board to get it to touch the post. As soon as you install the I/O shield, alignment goes completely out the window, and to get everything to touch you have to seriously distort the motherboard, and even then I don't think the contact between the CPU and the heatsink block is great (because at this point the board is twisted horribly).

In summary, the only way of getting the CPU square to the heatsink block is to:

a) Use only the heatsink nuts
b) Don't use the screws in the corners of the board
c) Don't use the I/O shield

a) and b) I can live with, but c) is what I'm struggling with. It looks ghetto, and if you aren't careful you could short something out by accidentally touching metal when plugging something in; unlikely but possible. It also lets in more dust than otherwise necessary, and in general is just poor practice. And at the end of the day, for a premium case (I paid £75), it is a fundamental flaw.

I'm posting this in the hope that others will see it and have another look at their setup. The problem is that I haven't been able to find any other passive cases. My options (none of them great), are:

- Live without the I/O shield
- Distort the motherboard and hope for the best
- Find another fanless case (haven't been successful so far)
- Find a case with a fan

Would be greatly interested to get feedback on other people's experiences.


I've just assembled a setup with an Asus Q87T, am using the motherboard faceplate, as well as the motherboard screws, and resultantly have observed the same issue as Rotor.

There's serious motherboard flex going on when I tighten the nuts of the cpu heatsink. Especially the nuts that face towards the mini-itx faceplate cannot be tightened much without causing massive distortion. For now, I'll only leave these half-screwed in and will carefully monitor the CPU temp to see if there's enough contact between the heatsink and the CPU.

Further observations:
- wrong type of screws supplied for securing the motherboard/hdd. Only 4 screws of the right type were supplied, which means I could only secure in either the motherboard or the hdd.
- no screws supplied for closing the cover of the case (the ones that go into the sides)
- indicator leds were poorly secured (with some sort of glue that came loose)
- the 2 pre-drilled holes for the rp sma connectors are a fraction too small, making it impossible to push the connectors through. I resorted to making holes in the motherboard faceplate for the rp sma connectors.

in the end, I would not recommend this case to anyone else. I feel it is not meeting the expected quality level.

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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Thu Dec 19, 2013 2:02 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 02, 2006 8:21 pm
Posts: 12
If you have problems with the fit of the Euler, you could try the Akasa Galileo. The heat pipes probably offer a lot more flexibility for the mounting.

Edit: BTW, the Galileo used in the SPCR review is only $45 viewtopic.php?f=5&t=47169. I know the cooling isn't as good and Mike didn't like the look and feel as much, but at $45 it seems like a steel. Wish I had bothered to check before ordering my Euler.


Last edited by avithomas on Thu Dec 19, 2013 3:47 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Thu Dec 19, 2013 2:46 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 02, 2006 8:21 pm
Posts: 12
FrankL wrote:
I've just assembled a setup with an Asus Q87T, am using the motherboard faceplate, as well as the motherboard screws, and resultantly have observed the same issue as Rotor.

There's serious motherboard flex going on when I tighten the nuts of the cpu heatsink. Especially the nuts that face towards the mini-itx faceplate cannot be tightened much without causing massive distortion. For now, I'll only leave these half-screwed in and will carefully monitor the CPU temp to see if there's enough contact between the heatsink and the CPU.

Further observations:
- wrong type of screws supplied for securing the motherboard/hdd. Only 4 screws of the right type were supplied, which means I could only secure in either the motherboard or the hdd.
- no screws supplied for closing the cover of the case (the ones that go into the sides)
- indicator leds were poorly secured (with some sort of glue that came loose)
- the 2 pre-drilled holes for the rp sma connectors are a fraction too small, making it impossible to push the connectors through. I resorted to making holes in the motherboard faceplate for the rp sma connectors.

in the end, I would not recommend this case to anyone else. I feel it is not meeting the expected quality level.


Rereading your post, I am wondering if you somehow end up with a gray market rip off. That description sounds pretty bad and much worse than we have heard from anyone else.


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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Sat Dec 21, 2013 10:19 am 
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Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2003 10:28 am
Posts: 72
avithomas wrote:
Rereading your post, I am wondering if you somehow end up with a gray market rip off. That description sounds pretty bad and much worse than we have heard from anyone else.


I bought mine off Amazon France, where it was sold directly by Amazon. When I look now, it currently only seems to be sold by a third party.

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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Thu Dec 26, 2013 7:56 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 02, 2006 8:21 pm
Posts: 12
Got my case today. The thing is very heavy. You really wouldn't want to drop it on your foot by accident.

The MB I used was an ECS H87H3-TI.

Everything fit with the MB face plate, but it was wicked tight. I feel pretty certain that the CPU sits flat because I applied the paste, put the MB in place, and then took it out. It was pretty clear that the thermal paste was even distributed.

One thing I noticed is that the back left heat sink screw was especially easy to over tighten (it is the one at the center near the edge of the MB.) You need to be careful to evenly tighten the screws, just turning each one a little bit at a time.

I also found that the HD cables needed to be folded just right in order to not rub up and bind against the side of the case when lowering the MB. Even with this, they still push up that corner of the MB.

You also have to be very carefully to align the MB with the faceplate before putting the board down. While lowering the board into place, I had to press the MB against the face plate as hard as I dared to get the heat sink screws to align. I was very much afraid of breaking something while putting it together. I highly recommend putting the MB in place without the faceplate and HDD cables first, so you can see how everything is supposed to fit when it isn't under strain.

Overall, I am happy with the case. It is a pain to assemble, but it does the job.

BTW, does anyone know where to get wifi antennas that fit the pre drilled sockets in the back of the case?


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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Fri Dec 27, 2013 12:05 pm 
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Posts: 72
avithomas wrote:
Got my case today. The thing is very heavy. You really wouldn't want to drop it on your foot by accident.

The MB I used was an ECS H87H3-TI.

Everything fit with the MB face plate, but it was wicked tight. I feel pretty certain that the CPU sits flat because I applied the paste, put the MB in place, and then took it out. It was pretty clear that the thermal paste was even distributed.

One thing I noticed is that the back left heat sink screw was especially easy to over tighten (it is the one at the center near the edge of the MB.) You need to be careful to evenly tighten the screws, just turning each one a little bit at a time.

I also found that the HD cables needed to be folded just right in order to not rub up and bind against the side of the case when lowering the MB. Even with this, they still push up that corner of the MB.

You also have to be very carefully to align the MB with the faceplate before putting the board down. While lowering the board into place, I had to press the MB against the face plate as hard as I dared to get the heat sink screws to align. I was very much afraid of breaking something while putting it together. I highly recommend putting the MB in place without the faceplate and HDD cables first, so you can see how everything is supposed to fit when it isn't under strain.

Overall, I am happy with the case. It is a pain to assemble, but it does the job.

BTW, does anyone know where to get wifi antennas that fit the pre drilled sockets in the back of the case?


With 'overtighten' do you mean to say to the point where the motherboard starts to show flexing? Cause the original intent of these screws is to tighten them all the way down (which with my Asus Q87T motherboard causes a large degree of flexing).

As for those holes: they are too small! you will need to drill them out a tiny bit (a fraction of a millimetre) in order to fit a pair of RP-SMA pigtails as they're called. Of course this will void your warranty (although, what kind of warranty can possibly be useful for a case without PSU?). Since Akasa does not advertise the presence of these wifi-antenna holes, we cannot really claim any wrong on their part. However, I consider it to be very unprofessional that the production version of the case shows issues like this. Maybe it's a case (pun intended) of getting the quality you paid for? It's relatively cheap compared to other fanless solutions...

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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Fri Dec 27, 2013 12:44 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 02, 2006 8:21 pm
Posts: 12
It seemed that screw I could turn down further than any of the others by a substantial margin and doing this would cause the motherboard to show a substantial amount of flexing. I backed off the screw and tightened the others a little bit more, so that they were all equal. Pressing down on the back of the CPU socket didn't show any give, so I felt that it was seated firmly.


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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Sat Jan 11, 2014 11:45 pm 
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FrankL wrote:
As for those holes: they are too small! you will need to drill them out a tiny bit (a fraction of a millimetre) in order to fit a pair of RP-SMA pigtails as they're called. Of course this will void your warranty (although, what kind of warranty can possibly be useful for a case without PSU?). Since Akasa does not advertise the presence of these wifi-antenna holes, we cannot really claim any wrong on their part. However, I consider it to be very unprofessional that the production version of the case shows issues like this. Maybe it's a case (pun intended) of getting the quality you paid for? It's relatively cheap compared to other fanless solutions...


Thanks for the info on the pigtails. I got them installed today.

The pigtails that arrived had a flat on one side and I noticed that the wholes in the case had a flat as well. They seemed to fit correctly, so I wonder if the difference in dimensions you noticed wasn't caused by the flat.


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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 5:35 am 
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Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2003 10:28 am
Posts: 72
avithomas wrote:
FrankL wrote:
As for those holes: they are too small! you will need to drill them out a tiny bit (a fraction of a millimetre) in order to fit a pair of RP-SMA pigtails as they're called. Of course this will void your warranty (although, what kind of warranty can possibly be useful for a case without PSU?). Since Akasa does not advertise the presence of these wifi-antenna holes, we cannot really claim any wrong on their part. However, I consider it to be very unprofessional that the production version of the case shows issues like this. Maybe it's a case (pun intended) of getting the quality you paid for? It's relatively cheap compared to other fanless solutions...


Thanks for the info on the pigtails. I got them installed today.

The pigtails that arrived had a flat on one side and I noticed that the wholes in the case had a flat as well. They seemed to fit correctly, so I wonder if the difference in dimensions you noticed wasn't caused by the flat.


That's very interesting! My connectors were definitely too big to fit, taking into account the correct orientation. However, the WIFI antennas fit my RP-SMA connnectors fine, so I'm hesitant to conclude it's due to my connectors to exceed the diameter specifications. Maybe something is wrong with the case I got...

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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 4:11 am 
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Hi
Thank you for an excellent review.
What 1150 boards are known to fit this case ?
Thanks!
Yair


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 Post subject: Re: Showed up at US vendor
PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 5:09 am 
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Aluminum wrote:
... though I'd rather buy it without. Shouldn't buy theirs anyways, amazon etc has 90W (or more) for ~$15.

They use the same plug that many Dell and HP 19V have, depending where you are its easy to get them for close to nothing or even free.

I just got one of these cases and took your advice about the power adaptor. I wish I hadn't as the adaptor I got from Amazon, a "PWR+ c20" has no power factor correction. Since this is for a 24/7 system I'd like it to be as efficient as possible and that's not it. Does anyone know of an efficient 19v adaptor for a mini-thin-itx mb in the 90 to 120 watt range? Thanks.


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 Post subject: Re: Showed up at US vendor
PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2014 10:48 am 
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-dg wrote:
Aluminum wrote:
... though I'd rather buy it without. Shouldn't buy theirs anyways, amazon etc has 90W (or more) for ~$15.

They use the same plug that many Dell and HP 19V have, depending where you are its easy to get them for close to nothing or even free.

I just got one of these cases and took your advice about the power adaptor. I wish I hadn't as the adaptor I got from Amazon, a "PWR+ c20" has no power factor correction. Since this is for a 24/7 system I'd like it to be as efficient as possible and that's not it. Does anyone know of an efficient 19v adaptor for a mini-thin-itx mb in the 90 to 120 watt range? Thanks.

Try a Seasonic SSA-0901-19 -- http://www.ebay.com/itm/90W-19V-AC-DC-A ... 1020266794

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Support SPCR by buying your gear through these links: NCIX, Amazon and Newegg


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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2014 5:17 am 
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Location: New Jersey, USA
I thought I'd add my brief review here in case anyone decides to do a build with this case.

Case: Akasa Euler S - this is the revised version with front USB 3
Power Supply: Akasa 120W Thin Mini-ITX
MB: Gigabyte GA-H87TN
CPU:Intel I3-4130T - this is 35W TDP part
RAM: Crucial 4GBx2 DDR3 1600 SODIMM
SSD: Intel 525 mSATA 60GB - OS and programs.
HDD: WD AV-25 1 TB AV Hard Drive - media storage
Blu-ray: Samsung Electronics Optical Drives SE-506CB/RSBD (External USB)

The Blu-ray player looks great and fits perfectly underneath the case. The feet of the case almost perfectly match the four corners of the external drive and it just disappears underneath it. This is predominantly a Windows Media Center HTPC, but I also run XBMC.

The I3 and 8GB of memory are overkill for simply watching video and Blu-ray. However, it serves as the heart of the entire house's media consumption. Cable TV is provided by a Silicondust HDHomerun Prime which provides up to 3 streams of video. I also have two dual tuner Silicondust HDHomeruns for broadcast TV for an additional 4 streams. This gives me total of 7 simultaneous video streams.

This also acts as a server for 3 WMC extender clients - hence the reason for the 8GB of memory. WMC actually runs each extender as virtual machine on the HTPC itself. This is how MSFT retains compliance with copy protected content. The biggest issue with my old HTPC server was what happened when it was recording 7 streams while playing 4 streams to each device. So far so good with this setup, but I haven't fully tested with that many streams in real life.

Biggest issue so far is Intel 525 mSATA. I chose this drive as my boot and program drive. Its MLC and seems to be one of the most heavily validated consumer mSATA drives on the market. For just a little more money I could have chose to go with a Samsung and gotten double the capacity. The concern was that it was TLC and newer to market.

My problem with the mSATA drive is the temperature - it idles at 57C and with random read HDD benchmarking utilities I've peaked at 78C. During normal usage I've had peaks of 74C after which it backs down into the middle 60s.

According to Intel:
"The Intel SSD 525 Series drive has a safety feature for monitoring temperature and for protecting the module from overheating, The operating temperature specifications of the Intel SSD 525 Series drive or 0-70 degrees Celsius as measured by the temperature sensor, SMART Attribute BEh," Intel explains. The drive may occasionally exceed that temperature range and will continue performing, however the Temperature Governor will act to regulate performance to a level that will maintain drive integrity. The host system should be designed to accommodate measures such that normal, typical, operations do not maintain drive temperature outside of specified operating temperature conditions."

We shall see how it does in real life... If anybody has any suggestions here I'd love to hear them!

Surprisingly enough the 2.5 WD HDD runs quite cool - it peaks out at about 55C with benchmark stress testing and idles at around 45C.

Because of the mSATA issues I'm having I would not recommend using anything higher than a 35W CPU if you plan to use mSATA. I wouldn't want to add anymore heat into the case. If you choose to use a 2.5 SSD I think you would likely be safe to use higher wattage CPUs.

My only other comment would be about this particular motherboard. It seems that almost all the units in the channel have a very old BIOS. They won't recognize the Haswell "Refresh" CPUs out of the box. You will need an old CPU to update the BIOS. Fortunately 4130T is an "old" Haswell and it worked. However, I wanted the most recent BIOS and updated it. What a pain in the neck. It is a business class board so it has multiple layers of BIOS security that must be disabled. And it has to be done from a DOS boot device only. Between creating the boot device and disabling the BIOS security and allowing USB boot it took me an hour to get the BIOS updated.

As for the case - I really like it aesthetically. Good price compared to other passive cases and I thought the construction was quite nice. It's a bit fiddly to put together - definitely not something I would recommend for a first time builder. But unlike some other folks I felt it was of good quality. In my case the motherboard also fit well including the I/O shield - very little deflection. Also one other thing to note is that the front USB 3 headers and thick cables make things even tighter inside this case. It fits, but on my motherboard the USB3 header blocks a bit of the small open side cutout on the case.


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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2014 11:44 pm 
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Posts: 437
Is the power brick the same one on the Euler & the Euler S? Any recommended bricks other then the "great wall" one that some suppliers have?

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 Post subject: Re: Akasa Euler Fanless case
PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2014 4:53 am 
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Posts: 18
Location: New Jersey, USA
cloneman wrote:
Is the power brick the same one on the Euler & the Euler S? Any recommended bricks other then the "great wall" one that some suppliers have?


Depending on the processor and configuration I ran my for two weeks with a 65W 18.5VDC HP Laptop adapter!

Most motherboards in this form factor ared designed to run on a voltage range of 18V to 20VDC.


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