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Antec Kühler H20 620 & 920 CPU Water Cooling Units

The Kühler H20 620 and 920 are self-contained liquid CPU cooling units from Antec (manufactured by Asetek). Hopefully they are improvements over the the first water cooler we reviewed, the Corsair Hydro H50, which was sunk for SPCR audiences by a noisy pump.

July 18, 2011 by Lawrence Lee

Product
Antec Kühler H20 620
CPU Cooler
Antec Kühler H20 920
CPU Cooler
Manufacturer
Street Price
US$60 US$100

Though mostly known for their cases and power supplies, Antec has been exploring other areas like CPU cooling. As we’ve mentioned in the past, it is difficult for a manufacturer to grab a foothold in this space with so many established brands and numerous high-performance models. For every Prolimatech that seems to come out of nowhere to become a big player, there are dozens that come and go before even being noticed by the majority of the DIY community.


The box.

Antec carries a few traditional heatsinks under the “Kühler” name (German for “cooler”) but they also have two self-contained liquid cooling units, the H20 620 and H20 920. They’re not the first to release such products, but it’s still a nice change from the countless tower heatsinks that we come across. We’ve seen so many similar units that they blur and blend together.



Package contents.

Both units feature a small heat exchanger that is mounted to the CPU, a radiator that is secured to a 120 mm fan placement, and 13″ tubes that carry water. The 920 is the more expensive model, being significantly larger, with two 120 mm fans to the 620’s one, and includes a fan/LED controller that communicates to the system through an internal USB cable.

They resemble members of the Corsair Hydro family which is not surprising given they share the same OEM manufacturer, Asetek. In fact the Kühler H20 920 and Corsair Hydro H70 look like carbon copies of each another except for the tubing; the Kühlers’ tubes are not corrugated, making them more flexible. We reviewed the Hydro H50 last year but were disappointed by the noise level of the pump. Hopefully Antec’s units don’t suffer from this problem.

Antec Kühler H20 620/920: Key Features
(from the product
web pages here and here)
Feature & Brief
Our Comment
CPU Socket Compatibility:
– Intel LGA 775 / 1155 / 1156 / 1366
– AMD AM2 / AM3 / AM2+ / AM3+
As one would expect.
Non-corrugated easy-bend tubes for maximum flexibility in radiator positioning Should make it easier to handle than the Corsair H50.
Cooling Liquid – Safe, environmentally-friendly, anti-corrosive Good to know.
Low profile pump ensures exceptional liquid circulation while preserving internal airflow An advantage in smaller cases.
Latest generation copper cold plate for optimal conduction Standard.
Kühler H20 920 Only Features
Included software provides essential tools to control and monitor the KÜHLER H2O 920 The 920 is the first cooler we’ve encountered that ships with fan control software.
Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) radiator fans generate the quietest high performance cooling PWM control allows for lower fan speeds.
Customizable RGB LED creates brilliant illumination Surely a must-have feature.

 

Antec Kühler H20 620/920: Specifications
(from the product
web pages here and here)
Model Kühler H20 620 Kühler H20 920
Fan Speed: 1450 – 2000 RPM 700 – 2400 RPM (PWM controlled)
Tubing Length 13.0″ / 330 mm 13.0″ / 330 mm
Radiator Dimensions 5.6″ (H) x 4.7″ (W) x 1.1″ (D) /
151 mm (H) x 120 mm (W) x 27 mm (D)
5.6″ (H) x 4.7″ (W) x 1.9″ (D) /
151 mm (H) x 120 mm (W) x 49 mm (D)
Fan Dimensions 4.7″ x 1.0″ / 120 mm x 25 mm 4.7″ x 1.0″ / 120 mm x 25 mm
Air Flow 81.3 CFM 110.0 CFM
Noise Level 27 dBA 43 dBA
Cold Plate + Pump Height 1.1″ / 27 mm 1.1″ / 29 mm
Net weight 1.5 lbs / 0.7 kg 2.4 lbs / 1.1 kg
Warranty Antec Quality 3 year limited warranty on parts and labor Antec Quality 3 year limited warranty on parts and labor

PHYSICAL DETAILS

The Antec Kühler H20 620/920 is composed of a large copper base attached with multiple screws to a thin plastic cup-like structure (presumably containing a miniature pump and reservoir), two 13″ tubes, and a large radiator that mounts on a standard 120 mm fan placement. Physically the only difference between the two is size; the 920’s radiator is 22 mm thicker and the heat exchanger is also taller by 2 mm.


The copper base is very large with a slightly rough surface.


Liquid flowing over and around the base siphons the heat away and flows to the radiator to be cooled down by the fan(s); the cycle repeats continuously.


Both the 620 and 920 have pass-through connectors so the fan(s) and pump can be driven off a single fan header. The 920 also has an internal USB connector that allows Antec’s software to control the fan speed and lighting.


Obviously the 920 is the higher performance model with a radiator thickness of 49 mm to the 620’s measly 27 mm.


In the final step, heat is distributed through nine rows of very thin coils and expelled out the case by 120 mm fans (one fan included with the 620, two with the larger 920). Note that the radiator is 151 mm tall so some room is required above and below the fan mount.

 


The 620’s mounting hardware. The 920 package is the same but with twice as many fan bolts and metal washers.

INSTALLATION

The most critical aspect of installation is that the heatsink be securely
mounted. A firm mating results in good contact between the heatsink’s base and
the CPU heatspreader and more efficient heat conduction. Ideally it should
also be a simple procedure with the user having to handle as few pieces of
hardware as possible.


First metal pegs are inserted into the appropriate mounting holes of the plastic backplate. Double-sided adhesive is applied to keep it in place.


On the other side, a metal ring is utilized to hook into the plastic tabs running around the rim of the heat exchanger. Little plastic cups with holes in them direct the bolts to the right spots on the backplate.


The ring should be secured loosely so the heat exchanger can finagled into place before being tightened.


The 620 fully installed. Note how the plastic cups have all cracked after tightening the bolts. It doesn’t effect anything as far as we can tell, but it’s an odd sight.


The 920 has a nice set of LEDs lighting up the Antec marquee. The color can be changed via the included software.


As we use an open test platform for heatsinks, we placed the radiator on a foam stand designed to eliminate vibration effects. During testing it was placed in a position similar to a rear 120 mm fan placement with respect to the motherboard. Note the very short 15 cm fan cable; if you decide to power the stock fan(s) separately from the pump, an extension cable will likely be required.

TESTING

Testing on larger heatsinks are done on our
i7-1366 heatsink testing platform
, while smaller coolers tackle our AM3 heatsink testing platform. A summary of the test system
and procedure follows.

Key Components in LGA1366 Heatsink Test Platform:

  • Intel Core i7-965 Extreme
    Nehalem core, LGA1366, 3.2GHz, 45nm, 130W TDP.
  • Asus
    P6X58D Premium
    ATX motherboard. X58 chipset.
  • Asus
    EAH3450 Silent
    graphics card.
  • Intel
    X25-M
    80GB 2.5″ solid-state drive. Chosen for silence.
  • 3GB QiMonda
    DDR3 memory. 3 x 1GB DDR3-1066 in triple channel.
  • Seasonic X-650 SS-650KM
    650W ATX power supply. This PSU is semi-passively cooled. At the power levels
    of our test platform, its fan does not spin.
  • Arctic Silver
    Lumière
    : Special fast-curing thermal interface material, designed
    specifically for test labs.
  • Noctua 140 mm fan (used when possible with heatsinks that fit 140x25mm
    fans)
  • Nexus 120 mm fan (used when possible with heatsinks that fit 120x25mm
    fans)
  • Nexus 92 mm fan (used when possible with heatsinks that fit 92x25mm
    fans)

Key Components in AM3 Heatsink Test Platform:

  • AMD Athlon II X4 630 AM3,
    2.8GHz, 45nm, 95W TDP.
  • Asus M4A785TD-V EVO ATX motherboard.
    785G chipset.
  • Kingston
    SSDNow V
    30GB 2.5″ solid-state drive. Chosen for silence.
  • 2GB
    Corsair Dominator
    DDR3 memory. 2 x 1GB DDR3-1800 in dual channel.
  • FSP Zen 300W
    ATX power supply. Fanless.
  • Arctic Silver
    Lumière
    : Special fast-curing thermal interface material, designed
    specifically for test labs.
  • Noctua 140 mm fan (used when possible with heatsinks that fit 140x25mm
    fans)
  • Nexus 120 mm fan (used when possible with heatsinks that fit 120x25mm
    fans)
  • Nexus 92 mm fan (used when possible with heatsinks that fit 92x25mm
    fans)

The systems are silent under the test conditions, except for the CPU cooling
fan(s).

Normally, our reference fans are used whenever possible, the measured details
of which are shown below.

Reference Noctua 140mm fan
Anechoic chamber measurements
Voltage
SPL@1m
Speed
12V
28~29 dBA
1250 RPM
9V
21 dBA
990 RPM
7V
15~16 dBA
770 RPM
6V
13 dBA
660 RPM

 

Reference Nexus 120mm fan
Anechoic chamber measurements
Voltage
SPL@1m
Speed
12V
16 dBA
1100 RPM
9V
13 dBA
890 RPM
7V
12 dBA
720 RPM

 

Reference Nexus 92 mm fan
Anechoic chamber measurements
Voltage
SPL@1m
Speed
12V
16 dBA
1470 RPM
9V
12 dBA
1150 RPM

Measurement and Analysis Tools

  • Extech 380803 AC power analyzer / data logger for measuring AC system
    power.
  • Custom-built, four-channel variable DC power supply, used to regulate
    the fan speed during the test.
  • PC-based spectrum analyzer:
    SpectraPlus with ACO Pacific mic and M-Audio digital
    audio interfaces.
  • Anechoic chamber
    with ambient level of 11 dBA or lower
  • Various other tools for testing fans, as documented in our
    standard fan testing methodology
    .
  • SpeedFan,
    used to monitor the on-chip thermal sensors. The sensors are not calibrated,
    so results are not universally applicable. The hottest core reading is used.
  • Prime95,
    used to stress the LGA1366 CPU heavily, generating more heat than most real applications.
    8 instances are used to ensure that all 4 cores (with Hyper-threading) are
    stressed.
  • CPU Burn,
    used to stress the AM3 CPU heavily, generating more heat than most real applications.
    4 instances are used to ensure that all 4 cores are
    stressed.
  • CPU-Z,used to monitor the CPU speed to determine when overheating occurs.
  • Thermometers to measure the air temperature around the test platform
    and near the intake of the heatsink fan.

Noise measurements are made with the fans powered from the lab’s variable DC
power supply while the rest of the system was off to ensure that system noise
did not skew the measurements.

Load testing was accomplished using Prime95 or CPUBurn to stress the processor, and the
graph function in SpeedFan was used to ensure that the load temperature is stable
for at least ten minutes. The temperature recorded is the highest single core
reading. The stock fans were tested at various voltages to represent a good
cross-section of airflow and noise performance.

The ambient conditions during testing were 10~11 dBA and 21~23°C.

Stock Noise Levels

Antec Kühler H20 620/920 Pump Measurements
Voltage
SPL@1m
H20 620
H20 920
12V
16 dBA
20 dBA
9V
14 dBA
17~18 dBA
7V
12 dBA
16 dBA
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from
a point equal-distant between the pump and the fan(s).
Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA.

The lower-end 620 ships with just a single lower speed fan and a thinner radiator compared to the 920, but it also has a quieter pump that measures just 16 dBA at 12V to the 920’s 20 dBA at one meter’s distance, making it the better candidate for low noise operation. That being said they both sounded worse than a typical case fan generating the same SPL. 620’s pump emits a low pitched constant buzzing while the 920 produces an irregular but sharper rattle. The volume diminishes as the pump voltage is lowered but the underlying tonality always remains. Editor’s Note: Keep in mind that the pumps are not recommended to be run at below 12V. However, we have not seen any signs of damage or other ill effects from undervolting the pump.



Kühler H20 620 stock fan above, 920 fan below.

Specifications: Antec Kühler H20 620 (920) Stock Fans
Manufacturer
Power Rating
?
Model Number
?
Airflow Rating
81.3 CFM
(110 CFM)
Bearing Type
?
Speed Rating
2000 RPM (2400 RPM)
Corners
Closed
Noise Rating
27 dBA
(43 dBA)
Frame Size
120 x 120 x 25 mm
Header Type
3-pin
(4-pin PWM)
Fan Blade Diameter
113 mm
Starting Voltage
3.5 V (5.2V)
Hub Size
43 mm
Weight
140 g (150 g)
Data in green cells provided by the manufacturer
or observed; data in the blue cells were measured.

The 620 ships with a seven-blade 2000 RPM 3-pin fan while the larger 920 comes with a pair of nine-blade 2400 RPM 4-pin models. Being such high speed models, they are exceedingly loud at full blast, though their acoustics are dominated mainly by turbulence. Under 1000 RPM, they sounded fairly smooth with a bit of a buzzy character. The buzzing might be the result of the poorly angled struts, positioned almost parallel to the trailing edges of the fan blades.

The 4-pin model doesn’t take well to non-PWM control as its starting voltage is just about 5V; below 6V, adjusting by increments of just 0.1V result in big RPM changes. The 920 has a software fan control system which could make this a non-issue.

Antec Kühler H20 620 Stock Fan Measurements
Voltage
Speed
SPL@1m
Fan Only
Fan & Pump
12V
1920 RPM
33 dBA
33 dBA
9V
1550 RPM
27 dBA
27~28 dBA
7V
1270 RPM
21~22 dBA
22 dBA
6V
1110 RPM
18 dBA
20 dBA
5V
940 RPM
14 dBA
19 dBA
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from
a point equal-distant between the pump and the fan(s).
Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA.

 

Antec Kühler H20 920 Stock Fan Measurements
Voltage
Avg. Speed
SPL@1m
Fans Only
Fans & Pump
12V
2360 RPM
48~49 dBA
48~49 dBA
9V
1930 RPM
42 dBA
42 dBA
7V
1470 RPM
31~32 dBA
32 dBA
6V
1190 RPM
26 dBA
26~27 dBA
5.6V
840 RPM
17 dBA
22 dBA
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from
a point equal-distant between the pump and the fan(s).
Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA.

As the 620’s pump measures 20 dBA at 12V compared to the 33 dBA for the stock fan, it’s probably best to control the two separately rather than driving them off a single fan header. At 7V and above, the fan drowns out the pump, so the pump might as well be run at full speed. There’s a similar mismatch with the 920, but it has an even smaller range of fan speeds where the pump actually makes an acoustic impact. We do plan on adjusting the voltage to the pump during testing, but it only seems worthwhile with the fan at 6V and below.

Kühler H20 920 Software

The fancier dual fan 920 ships with the “Chill Control V” software which allows users to monitor and adjust the fan and pump speeds via an internal USB connector.


Dashboard.

The main dashboard has temperature as well as fan and pump speed read-outs. A noise readout is also included but it is completely inaccurate. It might be based on based on the fan and pump speeds but it’s either a complete gimmick or calibrated poorly as 8 dB is impossible at any speed other than 0 RPM.


Fan control menu.

The software also offers graphing functions and a rudimentary custom fan control menu with starting and full speed temperatures.


Settings menu.

Of course an enthusiast PC cooling device is not complete without LED control. Yes, for US$100, you get a thick high enclosed water cooler, a fan control system, and the LEDs lighting up the Antec name on the heat exchanger can be adjusted to a custom RGB level. If you’re feeling festive, the boring blue light can be changed to pink with a few mouse clicks and keystrokes.

Cooling Results

Antec Kühler H20 620
Voltage
Thermal Rise
SPL @1m
Fan
Pump
Stock 120mm Fan
12V
12V
37°C
33 dBA
9V
39°C
27~28 dBA
7V
42°C
22 dBA
6V
44°C
20 dBA
7V
44°C
18~19 dBA
5V
12V
47°C
19 dBA
7V
47°C
16 dBA
Reference 120mm Fan (Nexus)
12V
12V
41°C
20~21 dBA
9V
45°C
20 dBA
7V
47°C
19~20 dBA
9V
12V
46°C
17 dBA
9V
48°C
16 dBA
7V
51°C
15~16 dBA
7V
12V
52°C
16 dBA
9V
52°C
14 dBA
7V
53°C
13 dBA

The Kühler 620 performed very well at high fan speeds producing a thermal rise under 40°C (excellent for our test platform); however, noise levels were very high. With the stock fan slowed to produce 20 dBA@1m or lower, the thermal rise increased to 44~47°C. The pump speed had no impact in performance when coupled with the fan running at 6V and below (above that level the pump starts to get drowned out, so you might as well leave it running at max).

Our reference Nexus fan on the other hand was very much dependent on the pump speed to achieve good results. With the fan speed at 12V and 9V, temperatures were 5~6°C higher when the pump was undervolted from 12V to 7V. When the fan became the performance bottleneck at 7V as the speed of the pump had almost no effect. Overall our reference fan performed on par with the stock model at comparable noise levels..


The Kühler 620 measured 18~19 dBA@1m with the pump at 7V and the stock fan at 6V.

 

Antec Kühler H20 920
Voltage
Thermal Rise
SPL @1m
Fan
Pump
Stock 120mm Fans
12V
12V
33°C
48~49 dBA
9V
34°C
42 dBA
7V
36°C
32 dBA
6V
38°C
26~27 dBA
5.6V
41°C
22 dBA
7V
41°C
19 dBA
Reference 120mm Fans (Nexus)
12V
12V
40°C
25 dBA
7V
41°C
23 dBA
9V
12V
43°C
23 dBA
7V
44°C
18~19 dBA
7V
12V
48°C
22 dBA
7V
48°C
17 dBA

The Kühler H20 920, given its larger size and two fans, gave us similar results, excelling primarily at higher fan speeds. It kept things noticeably cooler when the pump and fan were slowed to generate less than 20 dBA@1m though. Once again, undervolting the pump didn’t have any negative consequences when using the stock fans.

The pump’s speed was also a non-factor with our reference Nexus fans as there was a 1°C difference at most when the pump’s voltage was decreased to 7V. On the 920, the stock fans excelled, producing lower temperatures at similar noise levels. This is surprising given their history of superiority over the stock fans of most tested heatsinks. It seems the stock fans are well suited for cooling down the tight fin spacing of the 920’s radiator.


The Kühler 620 measured 19 dBA@1m with the pump at 7V and the stock fan at 5.6V.

Comparisons

Liquid CPU Coolers: °C Rise Comparison (pump at full speed)
Cooler
SPL (dBA@1m)
24
23
22
21
20
Corsair Hydro H50
44
47
Antec Kühler H20 620
42
44
Antec Kühler H20 920
41

Compared to the Hydro H50, both Kühlers come out smelling like roses. When generating around 22 dBA@1m, the 620 and 920 run 5°C and 6°C cooler respectively. This is due in large part to their quieter pumps which allow for higher fan speeds.

Single Fan CPU Coolers (ref. 120mm fan): °C Rise Comparison
Heatsink
Fan voltage / SPL @1m
12V
9V
7V
16 dBA
13 dBA
12 dBA
Thermalright Ultra-120 eXtreme Rev.C
38
40
43
Thermalright Venomous X
38
41
43
Prolimatech Megahalems
38
41
44
Noctua NH-U12P
39
42
44
Scythe Mugen-2
39
42
45
Cogage TRUE Spirit 1366
40
42
45
Prolimatech Armageddon
40
42
46
Zalman CNPS10X Quiet
40
43
46
Scythe Yasya
41
43
47
Thermalright Ultra-120 eXtreme
40
43
48
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus
41
44
48
Thermalright Ultra-120
42
45
49
Titan Fenrir
43
46
50
Scythe Ninja 3
44
47
49
Noctua NH-C12P
43
47
51
Zalman CNPS10X Extreme
43
47
53
Swiftech Polaris 120
46
49
54
Zalman CNPS10X Flex
45
50
54
Cooler Master V8
46
50
54
Scythe Grand Kama Cross
45
52
57
Antec Kühler H20 620
(stock fan, pump at 7V)
47
Arctic Cooling Freezer Xtreme Rev.2
49
52
58
Scythe Kabuto
51
53
60

The Kühler 620 fares quite poorly against the majority of single 120 mm fan tower heatsinks. At 16 dBA@1m (stock fan at 5V, pump at 7V) it produced a thermal rise of 47°C which places two spots ahead of last just above the Freezer Xtreme Rev.2.

°C Rise Comparison vs. Dual Fan 140 mm Coolers (reference fans)
Heatsink
Fan Voltage / SPL*
8V
7V
6V
18~20 dBA
15~17 dBA
12~14 dBA
Prolimatech Genesis
36
37
39
Noctua NH-C14
37
39
41
Thermalright Silver Arrow
37
39
41
Noctua NH-D14
38
40
42
Thermalright Venomous X
39
41
42
NZXT Havik 140
39
40
43
Antec Kühler H20 620 (stock fan, pump at 7V)
44
47
*Note: there are minor differences in measured SPL due to the variety of fan orientations and mounting methods offered by the compared coolers.

In a showdown against top-end dual fan heatsinks, the Kühler 920 doesn’t do very well either, achieving results 5~7°C higher than the NZXT Havik 140.

Now undoubtedly we will be inundated with comments about how these water cooling systems perform much better inside a case. You can also make the argument that these closed loop liquid coolers take up a 120 mm fan placement which could otherwise be used by a system exhaust fan which would give air-cooled heatsinks a leg up. We don’t test to see how coolers perform in one particular case layout with fans A, B, and C helping out, but how they perform against one another in as pure a form as possible. Our open testbed was deliberately chosen to eliminate these variables from the cooling equation.

MP3 SOUND RECORDINGS

These recordings were made with a high
resolution, lab quality, digital recording system
inside SPCR’s
own 11 dBA ambient anechoic chamber
, then converted to LAME 128kbps
encoded MP3s. We’ve listened long and hard to ensure there is no audible degradation
from the original WAV files to these MP3s. They represent a quick snapshot of
what we heard during the review.

These recordings are intended to give you an idea of how the product sounds
in actual use — one meter is a reasonable typical distance between a computer
or computer component and your ear. The recording contains stretches of ambient
noise that you can use to judge the relative loudness of the subject. Be aware
that very quiet subjects may not be audible — if we couldn’t hear it from
one meter, chances are we couldn’t record it either!

The recording starts with 5~10 second segments of room ambiance, then the fan
at various levels. For the most realistic results, set the volume so that
the starting ambient level is just barely audible, then don’t change the volume
setting again.

  • Antec Kühler H20 620 at 1m
    — pump at 7V, stock fan at 5V (16 dBA@1m)
    — pump at 7V, stock fan at 6V (18~19 dBA@1m)
    — pump at 12V, stock fan at 7V (22 dBA@1m)
    — pump at 12V, stock fan at 9V (27~28 dBA@1m)
    — pump at 12V, stock fan at 12V (33 dBA@1m)
  • Antec Kühler H20 920 at 1m
    — pump at 7V, stock fans at 5.6V (19 dBA@1m)
    — pump at 12V, stock fans at 6V (26~27 dBA@1m)
    — pump at 12V, stock fans at 7V (32 dBA@1m)
    — pump at 12V, stock fans at 9V (42 dBA@1m)
    — pump at 12V, stock fans at 12V (48~49
    dBA@1m)

FINAL THOUGHTS

The Antec Kühler H20 620/920 is a big improvement over the first fully-assembled one piece CPU water cooler we reviewed, the Corsair Hydro H50. The pumps on both units are considerably quieter, particular on the 620. This allows Kühler users to run their fans faster and produce better temperatures at similar noise levels to the H50. The smooth, non-corrugated tubing also gives them greater flexibility than the stiff plastic hoses of the Hydro series.

Despite these improvements, our final tests results were not compelling. Neither managed to match the majority of comparably priced tower coolers on our heatsink test platform. Given its street price of about US$60, the 620’s main competition are premium single 120/140 mm fan heatsinks. Of the 22 we’ve tested in the past couple of years, 20 of them outperformed the 620. The larger 920, with its thicker radiator, second fan, and fan/LED controller goes for US$100, making it fair game for expensive dual 14 cm fan coolers. We’ve reviewed only six of these beasts but they all outpaced the 920 by a large margin.

These units are popular amongst DIY enthusiasts who can’t afford or lack the technical expertise or dedication to construct a proper water cooling system, but from what we’ve seen so far, they just aren’t efficient enough. The Kühler H20 620/920, even though they have quieter pumps than the H50, are still handicapped by the additional noise source of the pump, making them impossible to succeed as super-quiet CPU coolers. When you consider the risk of leaking liquid into your system and the countless number of superior alternatives that don’t have this potential liability, it only makes sense to use them in cases with limited CPU heatsink clearance. Small microATX cases with 120 mm fan placements like the Silverstone GD05 and Lian Li PC-V354 come to mind. For performance oriented silencers, stick to tried and true air coolers. They are both cheaper and more effective.

Our thanks to Antec for the Kühler H20 620/920 CPU cooler samples.

* * *

Articles of Related Interest

Havik 140: NZXT’s First CPU Heatsink
Thermalright Venomous X Silent Edition CPU Cooler
Prolimatech Genesis CPU Heatsink: Retaking the Crown
Swiftech Polaris 120 CPU Heatsink
Zalman CNPS9900 MAX & CNPS5X CPU Coolers
Corsair Hydro H50 CPU Water Cooler

* * *

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