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Intel’s Plans for 478 & T Socket processors

An X-bit Labs article posted last week says Intel will offer 90nm products for socket 478, and also introduce some 130nm (Northwood core) processors for socket 775 (socket-T). To summarize,

For socket 478, well get more high end P4s — P4EE-3.6 (NW), P4E-3.6 & 3.8 (Prescott), and Celerons (w/256Kb cache) up to 3.46GHz. There’s also new slower P4-2.26 & 2.4 (533MHz / 512KB cache Prescott w/o Hyperthreading).

For socket-T, there’s low end NW: 2.8C, 3.0C & 3.2C (800MHz / 512Kb cache). And high end NW: P4EE 3.2 & 3.46 (1066MHz / 2Mb cache).

None of these models have been in previous processor roadmaps but were revealed to Intel’s partners in an announcement about new packaging for tray processors. Finally, “It is not clear whether the “unexpected” central processing units will be supplied into retail market, or will be available in limited quantities to selected computer makers.”

From our PoV, the expansion of “low end” (read: cooler) processors on both 478 and 775 platforms is a good thing, allowing for quieter systems, especially in SFF where the thermal challenges of the Prescott virtually eliminated 775 from the quiet race.

An X-bit Labs article posted last week says Intel will offer 90nm products for socket 478, and also introduce some 130nm (Northwood core) processors for socket 775 (socket-T). To summarize,

For socket 478, well get more high end P4s — P4EE-3.6 (NW), P4E-3.6 & 3.8 (Prescott), and Celerons (w/256Kb cache) up to 3.46GHz. There’s also new slower P4-2.26 & 2.4 (533MHz / 512KB cache Prescott w/o Hyperthreading).

For socket-T, there’s low end NW: 2.8C, 3.0C & 3.2C (800MHz / 512Kb cache). And high end NW: P4EE 3.2 & 3.46 (1066MHz / 2Mb cache).

None of these models have been in previous processor roadmaps but were revealed to Intel’s partners in an announcement about new packaging for tray processors. Finally, “It is not clear whether the “unexpected” central processing units will be supplied into retail market, or will be available in limited quantities to selected computer makers.”

From our PoV, the expansion of “low end” (read: cooler) processors on both 478 and 775 platforms is a good thing, allowing for quieter systems, especially in SFF where the thermal challenges of the Prescott virtually eliminated 775 from the quiet race.