Silent Supercomputing

The New York Times is running an article (free registration required) about two very different supercomputers. One supercomputer, called Q, follows the traditional path of packing as many teraflops into one computer as possible, without regard to power or heat requirements. The other computer, called “Green Destiny” takes a different approach. Relying upon low-power, low-heat chips from Transmeta, this computer is made up of a Beowulf cluster of machines and requires just a fraction of the power of the larger Q supercomputer. While the article doesn’t fall within the traditional boundaries of silent personal computing, it’s still worth a read.

The New York Times is running an article (free registration required) about two very different supercomputers. One supercomputer, called Q, follows the traditional path of packing as many teraflops into one computer as possible, without regard to power or heat requirements. The other computer, called “Green Destiny” takes a different approach. Relying upon low-power, low-heat chips from Transmeta, this computer is made up of a Beowulf cluster of machines and requires just a fraction of the power of the larger Q supercomputer. While the article doesn’t fall within the traditional boundaries of silent personal computing, it’s still worth a read.

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