Power Distribution in Three PCs (2012)

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Lawrence Lee
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Power Distribution in Three PCs (2012)

Post by Lawrence Lee » Sun Feb 26, 2012 9:06 pm


Kardax
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Re: Power Distribution in Three PCs (2012)

Post by Kardax » Mon Feb 27, 2012 10:31 am

Page 2 has an error: The 2500K should be listed as 32nm with a 95-watt TDP.

Interesting article :)

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Re: Power Distribution in Three PCs (2012)

Post by MikeC » Mon Feb 27, 2012 11:45 am

Kardax wrote:Page 2 has an error: The 2500K should be listed as 32nm with a 95-watt TDP.

Interesting article :)
corrected.
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Mr Evil
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Re: Power Distribution in Three PCs (2012)

Post by Mr Evil » Mon Feb 27, 2012 12:34 pm

What is the i7 system using all that 3.3V current for?

I look forward to the day when PCs require only +12V (or +24V, or any other voltage, as long as it's only one).

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Re: Power Distribution in Three PCs (2012)

Post by CA_Steve » Mon Feb 27, 2012 12:49 pm

Thanks for the update!
1080p Gaming build: i5-4670K, Mugen 4, Asrock Z97 Anniversary, MSI GTX 1660 Gaming X, 8GB 1866 RAM, Samsung 860 Evo 500GB, Crucial MX100 256GB, WD Red 2TB, Samsung DVD burner, Fractal Define R4, Antec True Quiet 140 (2 front + rear) case fans, Seasonic SSR-550FX. 35W idle, 45-55W video streaming, 170-200W WoW, 318W stress test (Prime95 + Furmark)

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Re: Power Distribution in Three PCs (2012)

Post by boost » Tue Feb 28, 2012 2:56 am

Thank you for the analysis.
It's good to have something to point to when people want advice on a new system and choose a 600W PSU for a system that's mostly the same as the i5 6870 combination from the article.
Lian Li V600, Asus P77Z-M Pro, i5-3570K 4.4GHz with Scythe Orochi, 140mm Slipstream 500RPM and Mugen2 115X Bolt through kit, Evga GTX 970 Superclocked, BeQuiet E9 580W CM

Hasdrubal
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Re: Power Distribution in Three PCs (2012)

Post by Hasdrubal » Tue Feb 28, 2012 4:46 am

boost wrote:Thank you for the analysis.
It's good to have something to point to when people want advice on a new system and choose a 600W PSU for a system that's mostly the same as the i5 6870 combination from the article.
Agreed. It's also showing that there's a definite lack of quiet, high-efficiency PSUs on the market for the 300-400W range. From a gamer perspective, it would be interesting to check the power consumption under gaming situation, to balance it against a full load situation, and help decide what PSU range once should get.

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Re: Power Distribution in Three PCs (2012)

Post by CA_Steve » Tue Feb 28, 2012 5:55 am

Hasdrubal wrote:From a gamer perspective, it would be interesting to check the power consumption under gaming situation, to balance it against a full load situation, and help decide what PSU range once should get.
Unfortunately, every game has a different load power. One could lightly stress a system and another could crush it...see my signature for an example.
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Re: Power Distribution in Three PCs (2012)

Post by Silverking » Thu Mar 01, 2012 11:30 am

While I appreciate what you have tried to do with this article I think it is very misleading. The reason I think so is because while the i5-2500K + HD 6870 is less efficient in power usage it is highly more effiecient in terms of processing power. If you were to run some benchmarks for the computers such as 3dMark 11, SiSoftware Sandra 2010, Blender, etc. and normalize them a set score you would find that the new generation of processors (xxxx models from intel and fx series from AMD) will perform quicker while drawing less power so your energy usage is lower overall. Plus with new zero power states on the processors and now HD 7000 series gpus the idle power is much lower. I am not saying I disagree with the fact that most of the computers (even gaming) need the high power output (750+) psu that are available but that it needs to be tempered by the ability of the system to complete the tasks. Howerver I could be wrong but if you would be so kind to test my theory I would appreciate it.

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Re: Power Distribution in Three PCs (2012)

Post by HFat » Thu Mar 01, 2012 1:40 pm

I'm not sure it's misleading. Almost every article comparing gear can be misleading to those who jump to unwarranted conclusions (most people, that is).
This article performs a useful service in documenting quality measurements of power use in real conditions. If you use it to determine which CPU is more efficient or something, you're using it wrong.
Obviously idle power is hardly a function of the CPU. The mobo is a lot more important for one thing.

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Re: Power Distribution in Three PCs (2012)

Post by smilingcrow » Sat Mar 03, 2012 5:10 am

Silverking wrote:While I appreciate what you have tried to do with this article I think it is very misleading. The reason I think so is because while the i5-2500K + HD 6870 is less efficient in power usage it is highly more effiecient in terms of processing power.
The article is clearly looking purely at the distribution of power consumption and NOT power efficiency.

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Re: Power Distribution in Three PCs (2012)

Post by wayner » Sun Mar 04, 2012 6:45 am

This article confirms my suspicions that most power supplies sold these days are extreme overkill for most users. Your i5 system would be a typical mid-high range system in today's market and you show that it needs no more than about a 300W PS.

Why didn't you run the same test with the i5-2500K system using the onboard GPU rather than a discrete GPU? I suspect that in that case your conclusion would be that a 200W PS would be sufficient.

A modern desktop system with a SB (or soon Ivy Bridge) CPU using on board graphics with an SSD really doesn't need much power. And unless you are a gamer I don't know how this isn't a sufficient system for everyone, assuming that you have one PC acting as a media server for all of your large files.

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Re: Power Distribution in Three PCs (2012)

Post by Olaf van der Spek » Sun Mar 04, 2012 4:57 pm

Intel CPUs now pull a greater percentage of power from the main 24-pin ATX connector, while AMD CPUs seem to be doing the opposite.
Isn't this a function of the motherboard rather than the CPU?

Mr Evil wrote: I look forward to the day when PCs require only +12V (or +24V, or any other voltage, as long as it's only one).
+5V looks like a good candidate to drop first. What's the purpose of the negative voltages?

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Re: Power Distribution in Three PCs (2012)

Post by Olle P » Fri Mar 09, 2012 1:24 am

Olaf van der Spek wrote:
Intel CPUs now pull a greater percentage of power from the main 24-pin ATX connector, while AMD CPUs seem to be doing the opposite.
Isn't this a function of the motherboard rather than the CPU?
Might be, but extremely interesting nonetheless!
In multi-rail PSUs the 24-pin connector is often bunched together with some other potentially power hungry connectors, while the 8-pin connector get a rail of its own.
Given that the 24-pin is also used to feed most/all PCIe slots with up to 6A each, this connector really deserve its own 12V rail.
Olaf van der Spek wrote:+5V looks like a good candidate to drop first.
Yeah, nobody use USB these days...

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