So you don't use filters....

Enclosures and acoustic damping to help quiet them.

Moderators: NeilBlanchard, Ralf Hutter, sthayashi, Devonavar

Post Reply
Bluefront
*Lifetime Patron*
Posts: 5316
Joined: Sat Jan 18, 2003 2:19 pm
Location: St Louis (county) Missouri USA

So you don't use filters....

Post by Bluefront » Fri Nov 05, 2004 3:53 pm

Filters too much trouble? Blocks airflow? I just blow out the dust frequently with compressed air, you say.?

Check out this close-call using compressed air on a motherboard. Maybe the guy was just dumb, but I prefer to avoid compressed air if possible, and use filters instead. :D

silencery
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 11:42 pm
Location: So cal

Post by silencery » Fri Nov 05, 2004 4:02 pm

but he got it fixed...

mathias
Posts: 2057
Joined: Sun Jul 11, 2004 3:58 pm
Location: Toronto
Contact:

Post by mathias » Fri Nov 05, 2004 4:31 pm

Compressed air sounds too expensive, I just use a blowdryer. Good to know it's safer too.

pipperoni
Posts: 218
Joined: Sun Oct 24, 2004 9:10 pm
Location: Toronto
Contact:

Post by pipperoni » Fri Nov 05, 2004 4:42 pm

I think if you can, it is best to use a vacuum. This way the dust is caught and you do not have to breath the crap that was just sitting in your computer for eight months.

josephclemente
Posts: 580
Joined: Sun Aug 11, 2002 3:26 pm
Location: USA (Phoenix, AZ)

Post by josephclemente » Fri Nov 05, 2004 4:52 pm

I can't even remember the last time I dusted my non-filtered computers. They stay very clean. :)

mathias
Posts: 2057
Joined: Sun Jul 11, 2004 3:58 pm
Location: Toronto
Contact:

Post by mathias » Fri Nov 05, 2004 4:58 pm

pipperoni wrote:I think if you can, it is best to use a vacuum. This way the dust is caught and you do not have to breath the crap that was just sitting in your computer for eight months.
Sure it works, but I find a hairdryer makes a difference to my temps even if my PC was recently vacuumed.

bob670
Posts: 49
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2003 7:47 am

Post by bob670 » Sat Nov 06, 2004 10:52 am

I'd like to think I am smart enough to used canned air without causing an issue, but maybe some people....

flyingsherpa
*Lifetime Patron*
Posts: 474
Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2003 6:28 pm
Location: CT, USA

Post by flyingsherpa » Sat Nov 06, 2004 11:20 am

bob670 wrote:I'd like to think I am smart enough to used canned air without causing an issue, but maybe some people....
ditto :lol:

Chunker
Posts: 62
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2002 2:55 pm
Location: Vancouver, BC

Can dust ever hurt a solid-state circuit?

Post by Chunker » Sat Nov 06, 2004 1:14 pm

I've never cleaned dust off of my mobo. Is there any possibility of damage? I can see it clogging up a fan or drive, but isn't the circuit board relatively idiot proof?

Bluefront
*Lifetime Patron*
Posts: 5316
Joined: Sat Jan 18, 2003 2:19 pm
Location: St Louis (county) Missouri USA

Post by Bluefront » Sat Nov 06, 2004 1:31 pm

I think the point here is that compressed air cans, blast out of a concentrated nozzle point, and have enough force to loosen connections and maybe break off MB components.

Careful use around computer components is a must....Me, I prefer to suck clean air into my computers. That's why I use filters. :)

bob670
Posts: 49
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2003 7:47 am

Post by bob670 » Sat Nov 06, 2004 3:29 pm

Not if you follow the directions on the can, I don't disagree about filters but there is nothing wrong with using canned air if you pair it with a little common sense.

Glen
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2004 12:20 pm

Post by Glen » Sat Nov 06, 2004 3:45 pm

Bluefront wrote:I think the point here is that compressed air cans, blast out of a concentrated nozzle point, and have enough force to loosen connections and maybe break off MB components.
The 10oz and 12oz "air dusters" that I've used didn't produce THAT much force. I suppose that if you had a loose component to begin with and you placed the straw nozzle right up against said component, it could loosen it further. However, there is no need to hold the nozzle that close and in fact it is best if you don't.

It seems to me that condensation shorts and thermal stress would be of greatest concern. To address those I a) let computer cool to room temperature, b) leave it unplugged for a while so that capacitors can discharge, c) hold air nozzle no closer than necessary, d) use intermittent short bursts of air, watching for condensation on components and tip of nozzle, and finally e) let the system air dry for a while before reapplying power.

I've never run into a related problem. Well, apart from getting the air duster rebates approved :x

Ralf Hutter
SPCR Reviewer
Posts: 8636
Joined: Sat Nov 23, 2002 6:33 am
Location: Sunny SoCal

Post by Ralf Hutter » Sun Nov 07, 2004 7:15 am

bob670 wrote:I'd like to think I am smart enough to used canned air without causing an issue, but maybe some people....
Right-on bro!

peteamer
*Lifetime Patron*
Posts: 1740
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2003 11:24 am
Location: 'Sunny' Cornwall U.K.

Post by peteamer » Sun Nov 07, 2004 8:40 am

bob670 wrote:I'd like to think I am smart enough to used canned air without causing an issue, but maybe some people....

Absolutely

Tigr
*Lifetime Patron*
Posts: 332
Joined: Mon Feb 10, 2003 8:18 am
Contact:

Post by Tigr » Sun Nov 07, 2004 1:34 pm

Bluefront, don't you find it more difficult to make a positively pressurized case quiet? I find it easier with the negatively pressurized cases for some reason. And if you want to filter a negatively pressurized case... good luck! Not that I do not use filters but they just don't help as much.

chylld
Posts: 1413
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2003 4:45 pm
Location: Sydney, Australia
Contact:

Post by chylld » Sun Nov 07, 2004 2:28 pm

pipperoni wrote:I think if you can, it is best to use a vacuum. This way the dust is caught and you do not have to breath the crap that was just sitting in your computer for eight months.
ideally that would be best, but i've heard of people who've taken the vacuum to the insides of their computers and killed components because of the static electricity that builds up in the shaft thing. after a few minutes of vacuuming with my dyson i accidentally touched the shaft and i got a VERY painful static electricity zap - i definitely don't want to join the list of people who've had their computers vacuum-fried :)

mathias
Posts: 2057
Joined: Sun Jul 11, 2004 3:58 pm
Location: Toronto
Contact:

Post by mathias » Sun Nov 07, 2004 2:37 pm

chylld wrote:ideally that would be best, but i've heard of people who've taken the vacuum to the insides of their computers and killed components because of the static electricity that builds up in the shaft thing. after a few minutes of vacuuming with my dyson i accidentally touched the shaft and i got a VERY painful static electricity zap - i definitely don't want to join the list of people who've had their computers vacuum-fried :)
Anyone know if this is also a danger with a hairdryer?

Bluefront
*Lifetime Patron*
Posts: 5316
Joined: Sat Jan 18, 2003 2:19 pm
Location: St Louis (county) Missouri USA

Post by Bluefront » Sun Nov 07, 2004 3:09 pm

Actually tigr, the last five computers I've built have been slightly negative pressure. I say slightly because I've increased the size/number of filtered intake openings quite a bit. This last build has two large passive vents, and one fan blowing in, sucking through another filter.

Which is quieter...hard to say. You'd have to make several experiments with the same/similar components to even hazard a guess.

But none-the-less, I advocate filters. :lol:

Check out this setup. Another big intake filter is hidden behind the intake fan. One fan blowing in, one fan blowing out. The fans are the same, with the output fan blowing slightly faster. Makes this a slightly negative pressure case....quiet and clean.

Post Reply