Fanless heatpipe on i5-6500 & MiniSYS T8.

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Altairst8te74
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Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2016 8:17 am

Fanless heatpipe on i5-6500 & MiniSYS T8.

Post by Altairst8te74 » Sun Oct 16, 2016 8:41 am

I am fairly new to this mini-itx stuff. Built an Amiga 500 pc using a Zotac IONITX-g and a C64 pc using an intel thin itx, both atom based.

Next up I want to put an i5-6500 & Asus H1101-PLUS-D3 into an MiniSYS T8 case that has a custom heatpipe cooler. Both sides of the case can act as radiators and the heatpipes attached to them, so the only worries I have are:

1. Is it a good move to run totally fanless? Either I use the custom heatpipe cooler or I use the stock intel cooler.
2. If I use the custom heatpipe cooler, do I put artic silver on the heatpipes that attach to the sides of the case? I know it has to be aplied to the cooler where the pipes all slot in. A block of metal fixes them to the sides of the case.
3. Would it make sense to shoe-horn a decent 90mm slim fan in there and run it slow?

Thanks guys :)

Vicotnik
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Re: Fanless heatpipe on i5-6500 & MiniSYS T8.

Post by Vicotnik » Sun Oct 16, 2016 11:07 am

Totally fanless works fine for normal use. And by normal use I mean that the system will not be doing anything heavy that fully loads it for hours on end. Don't go fanless if you intend to run protein folding simulations 24/7. :) I don't know anything about the MiniSYS T8 but I've built fanless systems in cases from HDPlex and Streacom.
If you decide to use fans, I'd get a different case. A cheaper one, built to allow some airflow.
Main: ASRock B85M-ITX | i3-4330 | 16GB DDR3 | Intel 730 240GB | HDPLEX H1-S | picoPSU | No moving parts | Idle 13.9W
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quest_for_silence
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Re: Fanless heatpipe on i5-6500 & MiniSYS T8.

Post by quest_for_silence » Mon Oct 17, 2016 4:47 am

Altairst8te74 wrote:1. Is it a good move to run totally fanless? Either I use the custom heatpipe cooler or I use the stock intel cooler.
If you go that route, don't use the stock cooler. Either fanless or a different enclosure.
BTW, is it a good move? I can't help.

Altairst8te74 wrote:2. If I use the custom heatpipe cooler, do I put artic silver on the heatpipes that attach to the sides of the case?

Thermal paste always helps: but use a different compound, AS is not that good nowadays.

Altairst8te74 wrote:3. Would it make sense to shoe-horn a decent 90mm slim fan in there and run it slow?

Seemingly that enclosure doesn't have proper ventilation holes, so a fan could mostly recirculate hot air: I don't think it will really improve the relevant thermals but just try it, in case.
Regards,
Luca

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Altairst8te74
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2016 8:17 am

Re: Fanless heatpipe on i5-6500 & MiniSYS T8.

Post by Altairst8te74 » Sat Mar 04, 2017 1:46 pm

Vicotnik wrote:Totally fanless works fine for normal use. And by normal use I mean that the system will not be doing anything heavy that fully loads it for hours on end. Don't go fanless if you intend to run protein folding simulations 24/7. :) I don't know anything about the MiniSYS T8 but I've built fanless systems in cases from HDPlex and Streacom.
If you decide to use fans, I'd get a different case. A cheaper one, built to allow some airflow.
How did you get on building the heatpipe cooler on the HDPlex and Streacom. I want to do it clean and not make a mess. I want to find the tool that comes with the HDPlex kit, the little stick thing with a ball on either end. Would mean I could do a clean job with the thermal goop.

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