Windows 7 network error log?

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jbw
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Windows 7 network error log?

Post by jbw » Thu Feb 25, 2010 7:38 pm

I just bought a new PC with Windows 7 and a new wireless N router. From time to time there are network connection problems, both the type where Windows says "no internet access" (but where the wireless connection seems fine) and where there is an exclamation point over the wireless bars in the taskbar (so it would seem it has lost the wireless connection).

These last just long enough to screw up my remote desktop or kill the transfer of a large file over the wireless lan--annoying.

Does Windows keep a log of network connection problems somewhere? I'd like to see how often this is actually happening and whether it's a Windows setting or a router problem (and I fear that it's the router). I looked under the event viewer and didn't find anything of use.

andyb
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Post by andyb » Fri Feb 26, 2010 10:26 am

I dont know of a network specific log, you can look at the "system event log".

This is how to find it under XP, pretty much the same under W7 I guess.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308427

The problem could be range, check that, also check the speed, because that can drop whilst the range is OK, either way that can cause a loss of signal.

To be sure it is a WIFI issue, I would suggest turning off the WIFI on the laptop and run it using a wire for a while.

Another thing to try, some Pre-N routers had various special speed boosting options that often screwed up the connection with various laptops/PC's. Have a look in the Wireless settings, and advanced Wireless settings for anything that "claims" to boost the signal, speed, range etc, including N, go back to using B/G, or G only, even if your laptop supports N.

Get back with your findings.


Andy
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xan_user
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Post by xan_user » Fri Feb 26, 2010 11:25 am

n standards were just approved last fall.

have you checked for updated firmwares for both the router and PC wireless radio?

and also check into any bios updates for PC as well.

it also could it be interference from a neighbor on the same, or nearby, frequency.

sjoukew
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Post by sjoukew » Fri Feb 26, 2010 12:13 pm

if there is a log, it is in:
control panel -> administrative tools -> event viewer.
it is a little bit fancier than the older windows event viewer, but it has the same functionality.

jbw
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Post by jbw » Mon Mar 01, 2010 11:33 am

Thanks, I'll check out the event viewer. It's a vanilla d-link N router and my computer has an atheros N adapter built-in. Both are running the latest software/firmware.

According to the router's log, it's re-establishing the connection with (i.e., re-assigning the same IP to) my computer when it happens. The router says the same thing when the computer comes out of sleep mode. Based on that fact it seems like the problem is on the computer end.

andyb
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Post by andyb » Mon Mar 01, 2010 5:11 pm

According to the router's log, it's re-establishing the connection with (i.e., re-assigning the same IP to) my computer when it happens. The router says the same thing when the computer comes out of sleep mode. Based on that fact it seems like the problem is on the computer end.
That is totally normal. On DHCP (which I assume you are using), you have a "lease" on that IP address. Basically it works like this, your computer asks to connect to the router, your router wants to give it an IP address, and will give it the lowest number in its range that is not already "leased" to a computers network cards MAC address (that is unique). By default the lease lasts for 24-hours. If you only have one computer connecting to your router it will always have the same IP address for that network device (i.e. if you connect with wired AND wireless LAN you will use 2 IP addresses), and whichever one connects firs (without holding a lease) will get the lowest IP and so on.

I found out a lot of years ago that life is much easier if you set everything yourself (known as "hard-wired", or "static", this is a phrase and has nothing to do with actual hard-wires). If your router starts the "IP-pool" at .2 siumply set yours at .50, and for evey other network connection do the same (but .60, .70 etc). This really simple technique often works.

Google will fill in the blanks for you - add your OS into the search.

BTW, this is not likely to "fix" the problem, but I suggest everyone does this anyway because you always know whats going on, and its one extra thing to rule out.


Andy
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xan_user
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Post by xan_user » Mon Mar 01, 2010 5:49 pm

my brothers n router locks out any n wifi cards if any other pc's are on the g frequency. his 'solution' was to disable n on the router and make it only g. he was happy enough with that so i never cared to try and really fix it for him.

jbw
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Post by jbw » Mon Mar 01, 2010 6:51 pm

andyb wrote:I found out a lot of years ago that life is much easier if you set everything yourself (known as "hard-wired", or "static", this is a phrase and has nothing to do with actual hard-wires). If your router starts the "IP-pool" at .2 siumply set yours at .50, and for evey other network connection do the same (but .60, .70 etc). This really simple technique often works.Andy
This is good advice, especially for printers and NAS boxes. Unfortunately it's not the solution to my particular problem. The hiccup is happening at times other than the DHCP release-renewal time. And as far as I can tell, it's only happening to one computer on the network (there are two). Plus, my former router (a linksys WRT54G) did not kick off its clients when renewing their IPs.

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