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1TB hdd. Samsung F2 Eco or WD WD10EARS Green?

Posted: Thu Jan 28, 2010 12:35 pm
by DG
I need to choose between these two 1TB drives and i can't decide. The nr.1 concern is reliability, followed by noise.

I've heard about the "feature" of the new WD Green drives, the head parking issues that theoretically shorten the drive's life. Also, the samsung drives sometimes make some strange noises when booting or from time to time (i've read somewhere here that it aligns it's heads from time to time, or something and that's the cause of that noise).

Anyone knows what should i choose? I don't want strange noises coming from the hdd or other potential problems. :?

Re: 1TB hdd. Samsung F2 Eco or WD WD10EARS Green?

Posted: Thu Nov 04, 2010 9:22 pm
by Moo
I have a similar quandary. 1 or 1.5TB, WD or Samsung...
I could get WD10EADS, HD105SI(F3), HD103SI(F2), HD154UI/Y(F2), WD15EARS, WD10EAVS.
Noise (idle) and reliability are more important to me than performance; this drive will be used for storage/games in an external enclosure.
From what I've read, it seems like the Samsung drives have a "nicer" idle noise in general than the WD ones?

Re: 1TB hdd. Samsung F2 Eco or WD WD10EARS Green?

Posted: Fri Dec 24, 2010 8:25 am
by Moo
I'm still in the same position. I think I can still obtain these drives, including the old (F2/EADS) ones, so would it be better for me to go for one of these, or a newer F4 or something? Any to specifically avoid? Reliability is the top priority, followed by noise and then performance.

Re: 1TB hdd. Samsung F2 Eco or WD WD10EARS Green?

Posted: Sat Dec 25, 2010 7:52 am
by HFat
If reliability is your top priority, in theory you should use the smallest amount of moving parts as possible. A high-density drive such as the F4 has a higher capacity for the same number of moving parts. That means you should ideally get single-head or at least single-platter drives. For many applications this simply isn't practical and the reliability you gain is marginal compared to RAID1 (or other measures designed to limit the impact of drive failures).
Some say that good SSDs (such as Intel's) are also more reliable than hard drives so that's something else to consider.