Gigabyte P35-DS3L rev2 VDROOP MOD, CONFIRMED TO WORK!

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nd4spdbh
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Gigabyte P35-DS3L rev2 VDROOP MOD, CONFIRMED TO WORK!

Post by nd4spdbh » Sat May 03, 2008 7:02 pm

Yup thats right Hank123 of ocforums.com with the help of my photos found a VERY easy pencil Vdroop mod. Woked like CHARM on my DS3L...
nd4spdbh2 wrote: ok just did a quick test to see what my DS3L does in non modded form... E4300 @ 3ghz @ 1.25v bios = 1.216V idle 1.184V load.

EDIT 2... OH SNAP... IT WORKS!!!.... default resistance for said resistor is 1975ohms, i penciled down to 910.... same settings as above (1.25V bios) and now ideling at 1.232v and loading at 1.216.... so up .016v idle and .032v load!!!!
nd4spdbh2 wrote:OH this is BIG... penciled the resistor down to 320 ohms... can you say GOOD BY vdroop??? YES Idle and load are now 1.232v WITH ABSOLUTLY ZERO FLUCTUATION!.... bios set is 1.250

hank123 you my friend are god!
nd4spdbh2 wrote: This vdroop mod allowed me to go from my original OCD E4300 @ 3.0ghz @ 1.250V bios (1.184v load) and take the voltage down to 1.200 volt (bios) and have the SAME IDLE and LOAD voltages of 1.184v

This also changed my stock clock lowest voltage. Before the mod @ stock 1.8ghz it took 0.95V in bios and i would load at 0.88V, now i can set the bios voltage to 0.90v and have it idle and load at .88V!!!!!!! All this with the stock VID of 1.3250 :D
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yuu
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Post by yuu » Sun May 04, 2008 2:45 am

i think it jus it worked on P31-DS3L, 1.387bios 1.344cpuz stable OCct/Idle, but one should really run TAT, it does 1.312, while OCct 1.328

Arvo
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Post by Arvo » Sun May 04, 2008 3:44 am

Just be careful. Vdroop is actually needed to keep CPU voltages in allowed area wihle changing CPU load. Eliminating Vdroop completely may yield to very strange stability problems (hangups, blue screens and so on), especially in load transitions.

If VCore is near maximum allowed, then load>idle transition generates positive voltage spike on CPU; if there's no Vdroop reserve, then this spike may go over limit.

If VCore is near minimum allowed, then idle>load transition generates negative voltage spike; if there's no Vdroop reserve, then this spike may go under limit.

But if you don't observe any instabilities and you can lower power consumption this way, then why not :)

smilingcrow
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Post by smilingcrow » Sun May 04, 2008 1:40 pm

Arvo wrote:Just be careful. Vdroop is actually needed to keep CPU voltages in allowed area wihle changing CPU load. Eliminating Vdroop completely may yield to very strange stability problems (hangups, blue screens and so on), especially in load transitions.
If VCore is near maximum allowed, then load>idle transition generates positive voltage spike on CPU; if there's no Vdroop reserve, then this spike may go over limit.
If VCore is near minimum allowed, then idle>load transition generates negative voltage spike; if there's no Vdroop reserve, then this spike may go under limit.
But if you don't observe any instabilities and you can lower power consumption this way, then why not :)
Anandtech ran an interesting article that included a look at this issue.

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