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Scythe Mugen 4 CPU Cooler: Scythe Strikes Back

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The Mugen 4 is the first truly elite Scythe heatsink we’ve tested in many years. An updated mounting system and an acoustically sound fan help gives it an edge against some its bigger, more expensive rivals.

Scythe Mugen 4 CPU Cooler: Scythe Strikes Back

August 27, 2013 by Lawrence Lee

Product
Scythe Mugen 4 (SCMG-4000)
CPU Cooler
Manufacturer
Scythe
Street Price
£35~£40

As some of you know, Scythe was one of the pioneers of aftermarket CPU cooling.
They helped popularize the now ubiquitous tower design adopted by the best air-cooled
heatsinks currently on store shelves. The original Scythe Ninja belongs in the
DIY hall of fame, a landmark cooler at the start of the tower era. But today,
someone looking for a high-end cooling solution is, more often than not, turning
to products made by companies like Prolimatech, Noctua, and Thermalright. In
this space, Scythe has become sort of a second class citizen.

That’s not to say they haven’t produced anything worthwhile in the past five
or six years. On the contrary, they’ve made some nice tower coolers, good GPU
coolers as well as some exceptional smaller CPU heatsinks like the Ninja Mini
and the Shuriken series. They just haven’t participated in the race to the top
that their competitors have been engaged in, with each new model getting progressively
bigger. The last notable big cooler Scythe we reviewed was the Mugen-2, which
won our coveted Editor’s Choice award in 2009 for delivering mid-to-high performance
at a relatively attractive price.


The Mugen 4.

We never got our hands on the Mugen 3, but the Mugen 4 is now here for our
appraisal, and it looks like an offering that might bring Scythe back into contention
as far as big heatsinks are concerned. The Mugen-2 had a very boxy appearance
while the Mugen 4 is sleeker and slightly slimmer. The structure has been revamped
to be less uniform with the heatpipes and fins taking on a more staggered approach.


The Mugen-2 installed with bolts entering through the trace side of the motherboard.

A bigger difference might be the mounting system. The Mugen-2 was one of the
first Scythe coolers to feature a bolt-thru mechanism but installation was finished
on the back side of the motherboard which is usually an awkward
procedure
. The newest Mugen uses a more modern and familiar scheme, similar
to those adopted by the big boys, the aforementioned Prolimatech, Noctua, and
Thermalright. If you’re going to copy someone, copy the best.


The box.


Package contents.

Included with the heatsink is a brief assembly guide, mounting gear, two sets
of fan clips, and a 120 mm fan. The fan is a Glide Stream 120, the successor
to one of favorite fan lines, the Slip Stream 120. Depending on how well the
Mugen 4 performs, the fan might be what puts it over the top. Aside from Noctua
and Phanteks, Scythe is the only major heatsink manufacturer to consistently
mate their coolers with excellent sounding stock fans.

Scythe Mugen 4 (SCMG-4000): Specifications
(from the product
web page
)
CompatibilityIntel®: Socket LGA775, Socket LGA1150, Socket LGA1155, Socket LGA1156, Socket LGA1366, Socket LGA2011 (Square ILM) / AMD®: Socket AM2, Socket AM2+, Socket AM3, Socket AM3+, Socket FM1, Socket FM2
Overall Dimensions130 x 88 x 156.45 mm / 5.11 x 3.46 x 6.14 (excl. fan)
Weight625 g / 22.04 oz (Heatsink only)
Fan Model NameGlide Stream 120 PWM
Fan Model NumberSY1225HB12SM-P
Fan Dimension120 x 120 x 25 mm / 4.72 x 4.72 x 0.98 in
Noise Level5.3 ~ 28 dBA
Air Flow20.7 ~ 79 CFM / 35.16 ~ 134.2 m³/h
Fan Speed400 (±200 rpm) ~ 1,400 rpm (±10%) (PWM-controlled)
Static Pressure1.18 ~ 15.3 Pa / 0.12 ~ 1.56 mmH2O
Fan Bearing TypeSleeve Bearing
Scope of Delivery2 x mounting plate (Intel), 2 x mounting plate (AMD), 1 x mounting bar, 4 x screw for mounting plates, 8 x stud nuts, 2 x mounting screws, 1 x spacer (socket 775), 4 x spacers, 1 x wrench, 4 x fan clips (2 sets), back plate, thermal grease, installation manual

PHYSICAL DETAILS

The Scythe Mugen 4 is composed of 50 aluminum fins friction-fit
to six 6 mm thick copper heatpipes which in turn are soldered to a nickel-plated
copper base. According to our measurements, the heatsinks’ dimensions are 13.0
x 8.8 x 15.6 cm (W x D x H) and the weight is 630 grams (750 grams including
the fan).


The Mugen 4 has a noticeably different structure than the Mugen-2 we reviewed four years ago. The heatsink is separated into four columns rather than five and the space between them is greater. The fins also overlap into adjacent columns at staggered intervals, so there isn’t a large uniform gap between the fin-stacks.

We never reviewed the third iteration but from what we’ve read it’s very similar except it used the flawed mounting system of its predecessor.


Scythe also managed to pack in an additional sixth heatpipe into the design. The pipes are heavily curved compared to the Mugen-2. The gaps between the heatpipes and the baseplate are noticeably filled with solder.


Measuring 88 mm from front to back, the Mugen 4 is quite thick for a single tower heatsink. It’s actually slimmer than the Mugen-2 by 12 mm but it’s still a dense body for the fan to blow through. The fins are 0.30 mm thick and spaced 1.82 mm apart on average.


The base of the Mugen 4 is a departure from previous Scythe models. The surface is slightly convex and the finish is a bit rougher. Gone is the almost mirror polish of the Mugen-2.


The stock fan is a Glide Stream 120, which has a similar design to the famous Slip Stream 120 we’ve come to love. Scythe claims that the new distinctive grooves chiseled into the blades on the intake side reduces air resistance. In retail, the Glide Streams also have rubber inlays fitted into the corners to minimize vibration; our sample lacked this feature.

BASE & INSTALLATION

The most critical aspect of installation is that the heatsink be securely
mounted. A firm mating results in good contact between the heatsink’s base and
the CPU heatspreader and more efficient heat conduction. Ideally it should
also be a simple procedure with the user having to handle as few pieces of
hardware as possible.


The biggest change from Scythe’s previous heatsinks is the mounting system which has undergone a much needed update. The new scheme is essentially the same as the almost ubiquitous system used by most modern high-end coolers.


Mounting clips are secured to a backplate with plastic spacers in-between to prevent shorts and to bring them up to the appropriate height.


A thick metal crossbeam over the base is bolted to the clips. This exerts pressure down onto the processor from above.


Fully installed on our LGA1366 test platform.


The fan blocked off one of the memory slots but it’s usable as long as the DIMM height is kept at a minimum. There’s about 38 mm of clearance underneath the bottom fin, more than enough to accommodate the VRM heatsinks on most boards.

Most of
the thermal compound was pushed out to the edges leaving only a faint
imprint at the center. This is a sign of excellent contact.

TESTING

Before thermal testing, we took some basic physical measurements.

Approximate Physical Measurements
Weight
630 g (+120 g with stock fan)
Height156 mm
Fin count50
Fin thickness
0.30 mm
Fin spacing
1.82 mm
Vertical Clearance*
38 mm
* measured from motherboard PCB to bottom
fin of heatsink
Large Heatsink Comparison:
Average Fin Thickness & Spacing
Heatsink
Fin Thickness
Fin Spacing
SilverStone Heligon HE02
0.52 mm
3.30 mm
Thermalright HR-01 Plus
0.45 mm
3.15 mm
Thermalright HR-02 Macho
0.34 mm
3.12 mm
Scythe Ninja 3
0.39 mm
2.64 mm
Noctua NH-U12P
0.44 mm
2.63 mm
Noctua NH-C12P
0.47 mm
2.54 mm
Noctua NH-D14
0.43 mm
2.33 mm
Thermalright Archon SB-E
0.49 mm
2.33 mm
GELID Tranquillo Rev.2
0.40 mm
2.30 mm
Phanteks PH-TC12DX
0.39 mm
2.30 mm
GELID GX-7 Rev.2
0.31 mm
2.25 mm
Phanteks PH-TC14PE
0.40 mm
2.21 mm
be quiet! Dark Rock 2
0.38 mm
2.22 mm
Prolimatech Armageddon
0.51 mm
2.08 mm
Prolimatech Megahalems
0.50 mm
2.00 mm
Zalman CNPS10X Quiet
0.40 mm
2.00 mm
Scythe Kabuto & Zipang 2
0.34 mm
1.94 mm
NZXT Havik 140
0.41 mm
1.91 mm
Scythe Mugen-2
0.31 mm
1.89 mm
Swiftech Polaris 120
0.43 mm
1.85 mm
SilverStone Argon AR01
0.30 mm
1.85 mm
Thermalright Venomous X
0.53 mm
1.84 mm
Scythe Mugen 4
0.30 mm
1.82 mm
Noctua NH-C14
0.38 mm
1.79 mm
Enermax ETS-T40
0.40 mm
1.79 mm
Scythe Yasya
0.32 mm
1.78 mm
SilverStone Argon AR03
0.42 mm
1.72 mm
Cogage TRUE Spirit 1366
0.40 mm
1.70 mm
Arctic Cooling Freezer Xtreme Rev.2
0.30 mm
1.70 mm
Scythe Grand Kama Cross
0.38 mm
1.66 mm
Reeven Kelveros
0.47 mm
1.61 mm
Zalman CNPS9900 MAX
0.16 mm
1.59 mm
Thermalright Silver Arrow
0.32 mm
1.57 mm
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus
0.43 mm
1.54 mm
Thermalright Ultra-120 eXtreme Rev.C
0.56 mm
1.52 mm
Zalman CNPS10X Extreme
0.42 mm
1.50 mm

Testing on larger heatsinks are done on our
LGA1366 heatsink testing platform
, while smaller coolers tackle our LGA1155 heatsink testing platform. A summary of the test system
and procedure follows.

Key Components in LGA1366 Heatsink Test Platform:

  • Intel Core i7-965 Extreme
    Nehalem core, LGA1366, 3.2GHz, 45nm, 130W TDP.
  • Asus
    P6X58D Premium
    ATX motherboard. X58 chipset.
  • Asus
    EAH3450 Silent
    graphics card.
  • Intel
    X25-M
    80GB 2.5" solid-state drive. Chosen for silence.
  • 3GB QiMonda
    DDR3 memory. 3 x 1GB DDR3-1066 in triple channel.
  • Seasonic X-650 SS-650KM
    650W ATX power supply. This PSU is semi-passively cooled. At the power levels
    of our test platform, its fan does not spin.
  • Arctic Silver
    Lumière
    : Special fast-curing thermal interface material, designed
    specifically for test labs.
  • Noctua 140 mm fan (used when possible with heatsinks that fit 140x25mm
    fans)
  • Nexus 120 mm fan (used when possible with heatsinks that fit 120x25mm
    fans)
  • Nexus 92 mm fan (used when possible with heatsinks that fit 92x25mm
    fans)

The systems are silent under the test conditions, except for the CPU cooling
fan(s).

Normally, our reference fans are used whenever possible, the measured details
of which are shown below.

Reference Noctua 140mm fan
Anechoic chamber measurements
Voltage
Speed
SPL@1m
12V
1250 RPM
28~29 dBA
9V
990 RPM
21 dBA
8V
880 RPM
18 dBA
7V
770 RPM
15~16 dBA
6V
660 RPM
13 dBA
Reference Nexus 120 mm fan
Anechoic chamber measurements
Voltage
Speed
SPL@1m
12V
1080 RPM
16 dBA
9V
880 RPM
13 dBA
7V
720 RPM
12 dBA
Reference Nexus 92 mm fan
Anechoic chamber measurements
Voltage
Speed
SPL@1m
12V
1470 RPM
17 dBA
9V
1280 RPM
14 dBA
7V
1010 RPM
12 dBA

Measurement and Analysis Tools

  • Extech 380803 AC power analyzer / data logger for measuring AC system
    power.
  • Custom-built, four-channel variable DC power supply, used to regulate
    the fan speed during the test.
  • PC-based spectrum analyzer:
    SpectraPlus with ACO Pacific mic and M-Audio digital
    audio interfaces.
  • Anechoic chamber
    with ambient level of 11 dBA or lower
  • Various other tools for testing fans, as documented in our
    standard fan testing methodology
    .
  • SpeedFan,
    used to monitor the on-chip thermal sensors. The sensors are not calibrated,
    so results are not universally applicable. The hottest core reading is used.
  • Prime95,
    used to stress the CPU heavily, generating more heat than most real applications.
    All instances are used to ensure full stress.
  • CPU-Z,

    used to monitor the CPU speed to determine when overheating occurs.

  • Thermometers to measure the air temperature around the test platform
    and near the intake of the heatsink fan.

Noise measurements are made with the fans powered from the lab’s variable DC
power supply while the rest of the system was off to ensure that system noise
did not skew the measurements.

Load testing was accomplished using Prime95 to stress the processor, and the
graph function in SpeedFan was used to ensure that the load temperature is stable
for at least ten minutes. The temperature recorded is the highest single core
reading. The stock fans were tested at various voltages to represent a good
cross-section of airflow and noise performance.

The ambient conditions during testing were 10~11 dBA and 21~23°C.

STOCK FAN MEASUREMENTS

Specifications: Scythe Mugen 4 Stock Fan
ManufacturerScythePower Rating2.16 W
Model NumberSY1225HB12SM-PAirflow Rating20.7 ~ 79 CFM
Bearing TypeSleeveSpeed Rating400 (±200 rpm) ~ 1,400 rpm (±10%)
(PWM-controlled)
Frame Size120 x 120 x 25 mmNoise Rating5.3 ~ 28 dBA
Hub Size36 mmHeader Type4-pin PWM
Blade Diameter113 mmStarting Voltage3.0 ~ 3.5 V
Cable Length30 cmWeight120 g
Corner TypeOpenRetail AvailabilityNo

The Scythe Glide Stream 120 series is available in 3-pin and 4-pin varieties of varying speeds from 600 up to 2,000 RPM. The Mugen 4’s stock fan is a 1,400 RPM PWM version not sold in stores. With a small hub and struts curved in the opposite direction of the blades, the fan’s structure is similar to the acclaimed Slip Stream line. The shape of the blades has been altered somewhat though. The tips of the leading edges are concave rather than convex, as if someone had taken a bite out of them.

Stock Fan Measurements
Voltage
Speed
SPL@1m
12V
1420 RPM
29 dBA
9V
1130 RPM
23 dBA
7V
900 RPM
16 dBA
6V
760 RPM
13 dBA
5V
610 RPM
11 dBA
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from
center of heatsink. Ambient level: 10 dBA.

The range of the fan is versatile. While fairly loud (29 dBA@1m) at full speed,
it undervolts well, becoming quiet between 9V and 7V, or at approximately 1,000
RPM. At 6V / 760 RPM, it’s almost inaudible, at 5V / 610 RPM it’s practically
silent. The fan is capable of even lower speeds, even on voltage control, as
the starting voltage is somewhere in the 3.0 to 3.5 V range.


This is the screen capture of Fan Xpert 2’s auto-analysis of the Mugen 4 stock fan on voltage control.

This is the screen capture of Fan Xpert 2’s auto-analysis of the Mugen 4 stock fan on PWM control.

Both on voltage and PWM control, the fan can be dialed down to about 400 RPM according to ASUS Fan Xpert 2 utility. This is perfectly in line with Scythe’s specifications.

Despite the minor differences compared to the Slip Stream, the Glide Stream
fan has a very similar sound. The noise character is exceedingly smooth with
a distinct lack of tonality. It has a tendency to whine at higher speeds typical
of almost all sleeve bearing fans and it’s not particularly unpleasant. There
is also some faint clicking at lower speeds but it’s only audible at very close
proximity.

TEST RESULTS

Test Results: Scythe Mugen 4
Fan Voltage
Single Fan
Dual Fan
SPL@1m
Thermal Rise
SPL@1m
12V
29 dBA
36°C
N / A
9V
23 dBA
38°C
7V
16 dBA
40°C
6V
13 dBA
42°C
5V
11 dBA
45°C
Reference 120 mm Fan
12V
18 dBA
40°C
37°C
22 dBA
9V
13 dBA
42°C
39°C
16~17 dBA
7V
11 dBA
45°C
41°C
12 dBA
Reference 140 mm Fan
12V
29 dBA
37°C
36°C
32 dBA
9V
21~22 dBA
39°C
38°C
25~26 dBA
8V
18~19 dBA
41°C
39°C
22~23 dBA
7V
15 dBA
42°C
40°C
18 dBA
6V
12~13 dBA
45°C
42°C
13~14 dBA
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from
the center of the heatsink.
Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA.

The Mugen 4 turned out to be a strong performer regardless of fan speed, generating
an exceptional thermal rise above ambient of 45°C at 5V and 36°C at
12V. The stock fan performance was on par with our superb Nexus 120 mm reference
fan and a bit better than our Noctua 140 mm reference model.

Given the depth of the heatsink, one would expect that a second fan would be
quite beneficial. In dual fan configuration, we observed a difference of about
3°C with our 120 mm reference fan and approximately 2°C with our larger
140 mm reference fan. Given the additional noise produced it does not seem worth
the effort, but this might be different if you’re overclocking and overvolting
a 130W TDP CPU more than we are on our test platform.

HEATSINK COMPARISON TABLES

°C Rise Comparison: CPU Coolers with Single Stock Fan
SPL (dBA@1m)
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
Thermalright HR-02 Macho
 
39
   
40
41
 
43
 
Scythe Mugen 4
   
40
  
42
 
45
Scythe Yasya
  
40
    
43
  
Cogage TRUE Spirit 1366
   
41
 
43
 
46
 
Zalman CNPS10X Quiet
40
    
42
 
47
 
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus
  
41
    
44
54
 
Silverstone Argon AR03
  
43
 


 
48
Scythe Ninja 3
  
44
 

 
46
  
SilverStone Argon AR01
  
44
 


 
50

Out of the box, the Mugen 4 is the second best single fan cooler we’ve tested, running almost neck and neck with the Thermalright HR-02.

°C Rise Comparison: CPU Coolers with 120 mm Reference Fan
Heatsink
Fan voltage / SPL @1m*
12V
(~17 dBA)
9V
(~14 dBA)
7V
(~12 dBA)
Scythe Mugen 4
37
39
41
Thermalright Ultra-120 eXtreme Rev.C
38
40
43
Thermalright Venomous X
38
41
43
Prolimatech Megahalems
38
41
44
SilverStone Argon AR03
38
41
45
Noctua NH-U12P
39
42
44
Scythe Mugen-2
39
42
45
Phanteks PH-TC12DX
40
42
45
Cogage TRUE Spirit 1366
40
42
45
Zalman CNPS10X Quiet
40
43
46
SilverStone Argon AR01
41
43
46
Scythe Yasya
41
43
47
Thermalright Ultra-120 eXtreme
40
43
48
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus
41
44
48
*Note: there are minor differences in measured SPL due to the variety of fan orientations and mounting methods offered by the compared coolers.

Armed with our 120 mm reference fan, the Mugen 4 landed a first place finish, beating out the venerable Thermalright Ultra-120 eXtreme and Venomous X.

°C Rise Comparison: CPU Coolers with 140 mm Reference Fan
Heatsink
Fan voltage / SPL @1m*
9V
(~20 dBA)
7V
(~15 dBA)
6V
(~12 dBA)
Thermalright Archon SB-E
37
40
42
Prolimatech Armageddon
39
42
45
Scythe Mugen 4
39
42
45
Thermalright HR-02 Macho
39
43
45
NZXT Havik 140
40
43
47
Noctua NH-C14
(top mounted)
40
44
48
Noctua NH-C14
40
44
49
Thermalright Silver Arrow
39
45
49
Phanteks PH-TC14PE
42
45
48
SilverStone Heligon HE02
45
48
50
be quiet! Dark Rock 2
49
51
53
*Note: there are minor differences in measured SPL due to the variety of fan orientations and mounting methods offered by the compared coolers.

Moving up to a single 140 mm reference fan, the Mugen tied for second/third with the Prolimatech Armageddon.

°C Rise Comparison: CPU Coolers with Dual 140 mm Reference Fans
Heatsink
Fan Voltage / SPL*
8V
(~19 dBA)
7V
(~16 dBA)
6V
(~13 dBA)
Prolimatech Genesis
36
37
39
Thermalright HR-02 Macho
36
37
40
Noctua NH-C14
37
39
41
Thermalright Silver Arrow
37
39
41
Noctua NH-D14
38
40
42
Scythe Mugen 4
39
40
42
Phanteks PH-TC14PE
39
41
43
NZXT Havik 140
39
40
43
SilverStone Heligon HE02
43
44
46
*Note: there are minor differences in measured SPL due to the variety of fan orientations and mounting methods offered by the compared coolers.

With dual 140 mm reference fans, the Mugen 4 finally faltered, but considering
the company of mostly dual tower heatsinks, it’s an impressive result. It came
within a degree of the Noctua NH-D14 and Thermalright Silver Arrow. The only
other single fan cooler that excelled in this configuration was the Thermalright
HR-02 Macho.

MP3 SOUND RECORDINGS

These recordings were made with a high
resolution, lab quality, digital recording system
inside SPCR’s
own 11 dBA ambient anechoic chamber
, then converted to LAME 128kbps
encoded MP3s. We’ve listened long and hard to ensure there is no audible degradation
from the original WAV files to these MP3s. They represent a quick snapshot of
what we heard during the review.

These recordings are intended to give you an idea of how the product sounds
in actual use — one meter is a reasonable typical distance between a computer
or computer component and your ear. The recording contains stretches of ambient
noise that you can use to judge the relative loudness of the subject. Be aware
that very quiet subjects may not be audible — if we couldn’t hear it from
one meter, chances are we couldn’t record it either!

The recording starts with 5 second segments of room ambiance, then the fan
at various levels. For the most realistic results, set the volume so that
the starting ambient level is just barely audible, then don’t change the volume
setting again.

FINAL THOUGHTS

Over the past five years we’ve seen multiple elite coolers from Noctua, Thermalright,
and Prolimatech trading blows for the high performance heatsink crown. Scythe
has for the most part avoided this arms race, focusing on smaller niche products,
even though they were one of the manufacturers that really kick-started the
big tower cooler market. It’s been a long time since one of their heatsinks
truly delivered top tier performance — I’m happy to proclaim that now.
I thought Scythe might be falling in the footsteps of crestfallen old guard
cooling companies like Zalman and Thermaltake, but the latest Mugen is a new
hope. The fourth iteration Mugen is a vital modern update that returns Scythe
to some much needed relevance in this space.

In our lab, heatsinks with convex bases have repeatedly outperformed their
flat or concave base competition, and Scythe has finally followed suit. The
new mounting system is also a much needed improvement, generating more pressure/contact
while also being easier to install than the Mugen-2. It’s not an original design,
but has been proven to be highly effective. These factors rank high among the
reasons for the new Mugen’s exceptional performance. The last bit that ties
everything together is the superbly smooth Glide Stream 120 fan. Many heatsinks
simply don’t ship with a decent sounding stock fan (even premier coolers from
Prolimatech and Thermalright) but with Scythe, you can almost count on it.

The Mugen 4 is currently selling for between £35 and £40. The pricing I’ve quoted is in GBP because Scythe lost its official North American distributor awhile back, thus the bulk of their products are now primarily sold in countries across Europe and Asia. I found a couple of US retailers selling the Mugen 3, so it’s possible they might get the latest version in sometime in the future. Availability is the biggest issue facing the Mugen 4; depending on where you live, it might simply not be an option.

One good alternative is the Thermalright
HR-02 Macho
. Another thick, single fan cooler with bare unplated heatpipes
and fins, the HR-02 has a similar price and cooling capabilities. The HR-02
is a more versatile cooler as it benefits more from a second fan, its wider
fin spacing is more conducive to passive cooling, and its asymmetrical design
alleviates any possible RAM interference issues. The Mugen 4’s primary advantage
is its splendid fan which is a big step up from the HR-02’s muddy-sounding TY-140.
The Mugen is also slightly lighter and slimmer. You can’t really go wrong with
either as both are more cost and size effective alternatives to the beastly
£60+ dual fan coolers that currently dominate the top-end of the
market.

Our thanks to Scythe
for the Mugen 4 CPU cooler sample.


Scythe Mugen 4 receives the SPCR Editor’s Choice Award

* * *

SPCR Articles of Related Interest:

SilverStone Argon AR02 CPU Cooler
NoFan CR-95C Copper Fanless CPU Cooler
SilverStone Argon AR01 & AR03 CPU Coolers
Noctua NH-U12S Slim Tower Heatsink
Cooler Master Seidon 240M: Dual Fan Liquid CPU Cooler
Thermalright HR-02 Macho Quiet/Fanless Cooler

* * *

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this article in the SPCR forums.

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