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Scythe Mugen Max & Deepcool Lucifer V2 Heatsinks

A followup to the Scythe Mugen 4, the Mugen Max features a larger 140 mm fan and an assymetric design to enhance its memory compatibility. Large enough to be a dual fan model, the Deepcool Lucifer V2 ships with just one, but is actually optimized to function with none.

February 23, 2015 by Lawrence Lee

Product
Scythe Mugen Max
CPU Cooler
Deepcool Gamer Storm Lucifer V2
CPU Cooler
Manufacturer
Scythe Deepcool
Street Price
US$50 US$55

Scythe Mugen Max

For many enthusiasts, the thought of a premier CPU heatsink evokes the image of a sparkling, dual tower, twin fan behemoth. Scythe however, has a more reserved attitude towards their products, even their top of the line Mugen series. Thus far they’ve stayed away from expensive nickel-plated fins that can be found on almost of their competitors’ high-end SKUs, and have stuck to a more pragmatic single tower design, passing the savings onto the consumer. The latest edition, the Mugen Max, retails for only US$50.


The Scythe Mugen Max.

Compared to the Mugen 4, the Mugen Max is slightly shorter and shallower, but the width has been increased in order to take better advantage of a fan upgrade from 120 mm to 140 mm. The heatpipes are now nickel-plated but they retain the same shape, as does the core fin structure. The fins are thicker and there are fewer of them, and the weight is distributed unevenly in order to keep the fan clear of the memory slots. This asymmetric strategy is becoming more common in order to improve memory compatibility with taller DIMMs and AMD boards that have the CPU socket positioned uncomfortably close to the RAM.


Mugen Max package contents.

Along with the heatsink and fan, included in the package is all the necessary mounting hardware, a packet of thermal goop, a small wrench, two sets of fan clips, and an assembly guide.

Scythe Mugen Max: Specifications
(from the product
web page
)
Model Name Mugen MAX CPU Cooler
Model Number SCMGD-1000
Socket compatibility Intel®: Socket LGA775, LGA1150, LGA1155, LGA1156, LGA1366, LGA2011 (Square ILM)

AMD®: Socket AM2, AM2+, AM3, AM3+, FM1, FM2, FM2+

Please note that for mounting on motherboards with the AMD-Socket, the original back plate of the motherboard will be necessary. Please confirm if it is on hand prior to your purchase.

Overall Dimensions 145 x 86 x 161 mm / 5.71 x 3.39 x 6.34 in (w/o fan)
Weight 720 g / 25.40 oz (heatsink only)
Accessory 2x mounting plate (Intel), 2xmounting plate (AMD), 1x mounting bar, 4x screw for mounting plates, 8x stud nuts, 2x mounting screws, 1x spacer (socket 775), 4x spacer, 1x wrench, 4x fan clips, back plate, thermal grease, installation manual
Baseplate Material Nickel-plated Copper
Fan Specifications
Model Name GlideStream 140 PWM
Model No. SY1425HB12M-P
Fan Size: 140 x 140 x 25 mm / 5.51 x 5.51 x 0.98 in
Noise Level 13 ~ 30.7 dBA
Air Flow 63,5 ~ 165m³/h / 37.37 ~ 97.18 CFM
Fan Speed 500 rpm (± 300) ~ 1.300 rpm (±10%) (PWM-regulated)
Static Pressure 0.15 ~ 1.02 mmH2O / 1,47 ~ 10,0 Pa
Bearing Type Sleeve Bearing

Deepcool Gamer Storm Lucifer V2

I’m not a supporter of passive cooling as adding a single fan running at a very low speed improves performance by an order of magnitude while staying practically inaudible to all but the most sensitive of ears. It’s a small niche but it’s one worth filling if only to gain notoriety. It’s not an easy thing to accomplish either; The only passive models to successfully cool one of our CPU cooling test platforms are NoFan’s CR-80EH and CR-95C Copper, which have an unorthodox construction compared to a more traditional tower design like the Deepcool Gamer Storm Lucifer V2.


The Lucifer V2.

While billed as a fanless heatsink, it does ship with a single 140 mm fan for “normal” users. It sports a six heatpipe design as well but has much larger body than the Mugen Max. It’s noticeably taller and is as deep as a dual tower model. Its broad fins are spaced in a much looser array to aid heat dissipation in the absence of active airflow.


Lucifer V2 unpacked.

Despite its monstrous size, the Lucifer V2 is packaged as if it’s fragile, encapsulated in Deepcool’s version of Russian nesting doll. The heatsink resides in a box with a larger box acting as a cushion, which is sandwiched between the fan and accessory boxes, all of which is stuffed inside a very tall exterior box. It ships with a manual, two sets of fan clips, a tube of thermal compound, a case badge, and mounting gear. All the accessories are separated into different bags which are sealed with staples of all things.

Deepcool Lucifer V2: Specifications
(from the product
web page
)
Application Intel Socket 130W
LGA2011-V3 / LGA2011 / LGA1366 / LGA1156 / LGA1155 / LGA1150 / LGA775AMD Socket 125W
FM2+ / FM2 / FM1 / AM3+ / AM3 / AM2+ / AM2
Overall Dimension (Without Fan) 140 x 110 x 163 mm
Overall Dimension (With Fan) 140 x 136 x 168 mm
Net Weight 1079g (With Fan)
Heatpipe 6 x 6 mm
Fin Material Aluminum
Base Material Full-copper base
Fan Specifications
Dimension 140 x 140 x 26 mm
Weight 143g
Speed 300±150 ~ 1400±10% RPM
Rated Current 0.17 ± 10%A (MAX)
Power Input 2.04 W
Max. Air Flow 12.6-31.1 dB(A)
Rated Voltage 12V DC
Operating Voltage 10.8~13.2V DC
Starting Voltage 7V DC
Bearing Type Hydro Bearing

PHYSICAL DETAILS: Scythe Mugen Max

The Scythe Mugen Max is composed of 39 aluminum fins friction-fit
to 6 x 6 mm thick nickel-plated copper heatpipes which in turn are soldered to a nickel-plated
copper base. According to my measurements, the heatsink’s dimensions are 14.5 x 8.4 x 16.0 cm (W x D x H) and its weight is 700 grams. The stock fan adds an additional 140 gram to that total, and it increases the cooler’s stature by 5 cm when centered (it can also be positioned lower as not to add any extra height).


The included fan is the GlideStream 140 PWM, a 140 mm 1300 RPM model that is also sold separately by Scythe.


The Max is quite thick but it has a lopsided shape in order to improve memory compatibility.


The heatpipes are distributed into four rows forming columns with the fins around them. Most of the fins in extend over to an adjacent column. According to my measurements, the fins are 0.40 mm thick and spaced 1.77 mm apart, on average.


A thick plate at the top holds the structure together. A hole is provided to access one of the bolts required for installation.


The face of the heatsink has jagged, canine-like contours.


The base has a convex shape and a very fine, reflective finish.

PHYSICAL DETAILS: Deepcool Lucifer V2

The Deepcool Lucifer V2 has a similar construction as the Mugen Max but is shaped and proportioned very differently. It has six heatpipes as well but three fewer fins (36) and measures 14.0 x 11.0 x 16.3 cm (W x D x H), making it bigger in every dimension. Our sample weighs 760 grams and 900 grams with the fan, a far cry from the 1079 grams listed in the official specifications. In the lowest possible position, the fan adds 4 mm to the overall height.


The stock fan is a 140 mm 1400 RPM model with a rubber frame, and a reflective hub and slightly ridged blades on the intake side.


The Lucifer V2 is also asymmetric but its fin mass is a bit more centered than the Mugen Max.


The heatpipes are more tightly grouped but the fins placed in a relatively loose arrangement. According to my measurements, the fins are 0.39 mm thick and spaced 2.44 mm apart, on average.


The large fins have a butterfly like shape.


The view from below.


The base surface is slightly convex and the finish is uneven, with ripple-like machine marks left behind.

INSTALLATION: Scythe Mugen Max

The most critical aspect of installation is firm, maximum contact
between the base and the CPU heatspreader for efficient heat conduction. Ideally
it should also be a simple procedure with the user having to handle as few pieces
of hardware as possible.

The Mugen Max utilizes the same updated system used previously by Scythe with the Mugen 4, Ashura, and Kotetsu coolers. It’s a similar method to other big name manufacturers and involves assembling a metal mounting rig around the CPU socket and pinning the heatsink to it using a thick crossbeam over the base of the heatsink to apply downward pressure in order to ensure good contact.


Fully installed on our LGA1366 test platform.


With its asymmetric shape, the Max’s fan clears the first memory slot with ease. There is 51 mm of clearance under the heatsink.


The thermal compound imprint left behind is uneven due to the Max’s weight distribution but it clearly shows excellent contact at the center. Almost all the excess compound is pushed to the sides.

INSTALLATION: Deepcool Lucifer V2

The Lucifer V2 uses the same basic installation method as the Mugen Max but it’s a bit easier to put together as the mounting assembly is secured with thumbnuts instead of screws.


Bolts are inserted through the appropriate holes in the backplate and rubber covers are slipped over to keep them immobilized. On the opposite side, plastic spacers are dropped over them and mounting clips are attached with thumbnuts. A cross bar is positioned over the base of the heatsink which is then connected to the clips with spring-loaded bolts.


Fully assembled.


The Lucifer V2’s fan overhangs the entirety of the first memory slot. There is 53 mm of clearance under the heatsink.


The residual thermal compound left behind indicates strong contact is being made at the center of the heatspreader.

TESTING

Before thermal testing, we took some basic physical measurements of the product(s) for comparison.

Approximate Physical Measurements
Model Scythe Mugen Max Deepcool Lucifer V2
Weight
700 g (heatsink only)
840 g (with stock fan)
760 g (heatsink only)
900 g (with stock fan)
Height 160 mm 163 mm
Fin count 39 36
Fin thickness
0.40 mm 0.39 mm
Fin spacing
1.77 mm 2.44 mm
Vertical Clearance*
51 mm 53 mm
* measured from motherboard PCB to bottom
fin of heatsink

 

Large Heatsink Comparison:
Average Fin Thickness & Spacing
Heatsink
Fin Thickness
Fin Spacing
SilverStone Heligon HE02
0.52 mm
3.30 mm
Thermalright HR-01 Plus
0.45 mm
3.15 mm
Thermalright HR-02 Macho
0.34 mm
3.12 mm
Thermalright HR-22
0.53 mm
2.74 mm
Scythe Ninja 3
0.39 mm
2.64 mm
Noctua NH-U12P
0.44 mm
2.63 mm
Noctua NH-C12P
0.47 mm
2.54 mm
Cryorig H5 Universal
0.40 mm
2.47 mm
Deepcool Gamer Storm Lucifer V2

0.39 mm

2.44 mm
LEPA LV12
0.51 mm
2.38 mm
Noctua NH-D14
0.43 mm
2.33 mm
Thermalright Archon SB-E
0.49 mm
2.33 mm
Phanteks PH-TC12DX
0.39 mm
2.30 mm
GELID Tranquillo Rev.2
0.40 mm
2.30 mm
GELID GX-7 Rev.2
0.31 mm
2.25 mm
Be Quiet! Dark Rock Pro 3
0.40 mm
2.24 mm
Be Quiet! Dark Rock 2
0.38 mm
2.22 mm
Phanteks PH-TC14PE
0.40 mm
2.21 mm
Prolimatech Armageddon
0.51 mm
2.08 mm
Cryorig R1 Ultimate/Universal
0.42 mm
1.78 / 2.37 mm
Zalman CNPS10X Quiet
0.40 mm
2.00 mm
Prolimatech Megahalems
0.50 mm
2.00 mm
Scythe Ashura
0.43 mm
1.97 mm
NZXT Havik 140
0.41 mm
1.91 mm
Scythe Mugen-2
0.31 mm
1.89 mm
SilverStone Tundra TD03 (radiator)
0.43 mm
1.86 mm
SilverStone Argon AR01
0.30 mm
1.85 mm
Thermalright Venomous X
0.53 mm
1.84 mm
Scythe Mugen 4
0.30 mm
1.82 mm
Noctua NH-C14
0.38 mm
1.79 mm
Enermax ETS-T40
0.40 mm
1.79 mm
Noctua NH-D15
0.46 mm
1.79 mm
Scythe Yasya
0.32 mm
1.78 mm

Scythe Mugen Max

0.40 mm

1.77 mm
Enermax Liqtech 120X (radiator)
0.46 mm
1.76 mm
Be Quiet! Shadow Rock Slim
0.42 mm
1.73 mm
SilverStone Argon AR03
0.42 mm
1.72 mm
Noctua NH-U14S
0.42 mm
1.72 mm
Cogage TRUE Spirit 1366
0.40 mm
1.70 mm
Scythe Kotetsu
0.35 mm
1.66 mm
Scythe Grand Kama Cross
0.38 mm
1.66 mm
Zalman CNPS9900 MAX
0.16 mm
1.59 mm
Thermalright Silver Arrow
0.32 mm
1.57 mm
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus
0.43 mm
1.54 mm
Thermalright Ultra-120 eXtreme Rev.C
0.56 mm
1.52 mm
Swiftech H240-X (radiator)
0.13 mm
1.80 mm
Deepcool Gamer Storm
Maelstrom 240 (radiator)
0.26 mm
1.14 mm
NZXT Kraken X31/X41 (radiator)
0.15 mm
1.07 mm
NZXT Kraken X61 (radiator)
0.13 mm
1.02 mm

Larger heatsinks are tested on our
LGA1366 heatsink testing platform
, while smaller coolers tackle our
LGA1155
heatsink testing platform
. A summary of the test system and procedure follows.

Key Components in LGA1366 Heatsink Test Platform:

Key Components in LGA1155 Heatsink Test Platform:

The systems are silent under the test conditions, except for the CPU cooling
fan(s).

Normally, our reference fans are used whenever possible, the measured details
of which are shown below.

Reference Noctua 140mm fan
Anechoic chamber measurements
Voltage
Speed
SPL@1m
12V
1250 RPM
28~29 dBA
9V
990 RPM
21 dBA
8V
880 RPM
18 dBA
7V
770 RPM
15~16 dBA
6V
660 RPM
13 dBA

 

Reference Nexus 120 mm fan
Anechoic chamber measurements
Voltage
Speed
SPL@1m
12V
1080 RPM
16 dBA
9V
880 RPM
13 dBA
7V
720 RPM
12 dBA

 

Reference Nexus 92 mm fan
Anechoic chamber measurements
Voltage
Speed
SPL@1m
12V
1470 RPM
17 dBA
9V
1280 RPM
14 dBA
7V
1010 RPM
12 dBA

Measurement and Analysis Tools

  • Extech 380803 AC power analyzer / data logger for measuring AC system
    power.
  • Custom-built, four-channel variable DC power supply, used to regulate
    the fan speed during the test.
  • PC-based spectrum analyzer:
    SpectraPlus with ACO Pacific mic and M-Audio digital
    audio interfaces.
  • Anechoic chamber
    with ambient level of 11 dBA or lower
  • Various other tools for testing fans, as documented in our
    standard fan testing methodology
    .
  • SpeedFan,
    used to monitor the on-chip thermal sensors. The sensors are not calibrated,
    so results are not universally applicable. The hottest core reading is used.
  • Prime95,
    used to stress the CPU heavily, generating more heat than most real applications.
    All instances are used to ensure full stress.
  • CPU-Z,used to monitor the CPU speed to determine when overheating occurs.
  • Thermometers to measure the air temperature around the test platform
    and near the intake of the heatsink fan.

Noise measurements are made with the fans powered from a separate, fanless system. Load testing was accomplished using Prime95 to stress the processor, and the
graph function in SpeedFan was used to ensure that the load temperature is stable
for at least ten minutes. The temperature recorded is the highest single core
reading. The stock fans were tested at various voltages to represent a good
cross-section of airflow and noise performance.

The ambient conditions during testing were 10~11 dBA and 21~23°C.

Noise Measurements: Scythe Mugen Max

Specifications: Scythe Mugen Max Stock Fan
Manufacturer Scythe Power Rating 4.44 W
Model Number SY1425HB12M-P Airflow Rating 37.37 ~ 97.18 CFM
Bearing Type Sleeve Speed Rating 500 ~ 1300 RPM
Frame Size 140 x 140 x 25 mm (120 mm mounting holes) Noise Rating 13 ~ 30.7 dBA
Hub Size 40 mm Header Type 4-pin PWM
Blade Diameter 129 mm Starting Voltage < 4.0 V
Cable Length 30 cm Weight 140 g
Corner Type Open Retail Availability Yes
Data in blue cells provided by the manufacturer
or observed; data in the green cells were measured.

The Mugen Max’s stock fan is the same as the Scythe Ashura, the PWM version of the GlideStream 140 with sleeve bearings. It has an octagonal frame with square corners poking out to give it standard 120 mm mounting holes to maximize compatibility and fairly skinny blades compared to most 140 mm models.

Stock Fan Measurements
PWM Setting
Speed
SPL@1m
100%
1300 RPM
32 dBA
65%
940 RPM
25~26 dBA
60%
810 RPM
20 dBA
55%
700 RPM
16 dBA
50%
590 RPM
13 dBA
0%
380 RPM
12 dBA
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from
the center of the heatsink.
Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA.

On PWM control, our sample’s speed range is impressive, from 1300 RPM all the way down to a paltry 380 RPM. It’s practically inaudible at minimum speed and stays quiet (by our standards) up to about 800 RPM.

The acoustic profile of the stock fan is smooth for the most part though there is some underlying chatter emitted by the bearings. At lower speeds, there is some noticeable clickiness, especially at lower speeds when there is less air turbulence masking the effect. Of course this is in open air — inside a case this characteristic probably isn’t audible except at very close proximity, assuming the other components are very quiet.

Noise Measurements: Deepcool Lucifer V2

Specifications: Deepcool Lucifer V2 Stock Fan
Manufacturer Deepcool Power Rating 2.04 W
Model Number ? Airflow Rating 81.33 CFM
Bearing Type Hydro Speed Rating 300 ~ 1400 RPM
Frame Size 140 x 140 x 25 mm
(120 mm mounting holes)
Noise Rating 12.6 ~ 31.1 dBA
Hub Size 41 mm Header Type 4-pin PWM
Blade Diameter 126 mm Starting Voltage 4.5 ~ 5.0 V
Cable Length 42 cm Weight 90 g
Corner Type Open Retail Availability No

Data in blue cells provided by the manufacturer
or observed; data in the green cells were measured.

The Lucifer V2’s stock fan appears to their GF140 retail fan but with a slimmer frame and slightly higher nominal speed. The blades are of average size though they’re slightly shorter than most 140 mm models, and the low angle they form with straight struts has been known to increase tonality.

Stock Fan Measurements
PWM Setting
Speed
SPL@1m
100%
1360 RPM
34 dBA
65%
1020 RPM
25 dBA
60%
930 RPM
21~22 dBA
55%
830 RPM
19 dBA
50%
720 RPM
16 dBA
45%
580 RPM
13 dBA
0%
360 RPM
12 dBA
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from
the center of the heatsink.
Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA.

Deepcool’s fan can hit very low speeds on PWM control as well, with our sample bottoming out at a mere 360 RPM. The fan is quiet at about 900 RPM and below.

The stock fan has a consistent noise quality throughout its range. For the most part it’s smooth but it’s afflicted with a low-pitched clicking noise that persists up until 1000 RPM. This effect is sharper and more pronounced than the Mugen Max fan. In a very quiet system, it may be audible to hyper-sensitive users.

Test Results: Active Cooling

Test Results: Scythe Mugen Max
Fan Setting
Single Fan
Dual Fan
SPL@1m
Thermal Rise
SPL@1m
100%
32 dBA
34°C
N/A
65%
25~26 dBA
37°C
60%
20 dBA
38°C
55%
16 dBA
39°C
50%
13 dBA
43°C
Reference 140 mm Fan (NF-P14)
12V
29 dBA
37°C
36°C
33~34 dBA
9V
22 dBA
39°C
36°C
26 dBA
8V
19 dBA
41°C
37°C
23 dBA
7V
16~17 dBA
42°C
39°C
19~20 dBA
6V
14 dBA
43°C
41°C
16 dBA
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from
the center of the heatsink.
Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA.

The Mugen Max performs strongly on our test platform, keeping the CPU thermal rise below 40°C for most of the stock fan’s range. Its sweet spot is at 55% on PWM control (830 RPM), a very quiet level for most users. Our reference fan fails to improve on these results, and in fact delivers inferior cooling when outputting similar noise levels to the stock fan. Dual fan operation is most advantageous in the middle of reference fan’s speed range, improving performance by 3~4°C, but it’s less effective at very high/low speeds.

Test Results: Deepcool Gamer Storm Lucifer V2
Fan Setting
Single Fan
Dual Fan
SPL@1m
Thermal Rise
SPL@1m
100%
34 dBA
39°C
N/A
65%
25 dBA
41°C
60%
21~22 dBA
41°C
55%
19 dBA
43°C
50%
16 dBA
45°C
45%
13 dBA
49°C
Reference 140 mm Fan (NF-P14)
12V
31 dBA
39°C
37°C
34~35 dBA
9V
24 dBA
40°C
39°C
28~29 dBA
8V
21 dBA
42°C
40°C
24 dBA
7V
16~17 dBA
42°C
40°C
22 dBA
6V
14 dBA
44°C
41°C
17 dBA
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from
the center of the heatsink.
Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA.

The Lucifer V2 proves that bigger is not necessarily better, producing noticeably higher temperatures than the Mugen Max. Its proficiency is especially disappointing with very low fan speeds, but this is due to the stock fan more than anything; Our reference fan is markedly superior at lower speeds. Typically a big heatsink benefits more from a push-pull twin fan configuration but adding a second fan results in only a marginal improvement at all but the lowest fan speeds.

Comparison Table

CPU Thermal Rise Comparison (°C)
SPL (dBA@1m)
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
NZXT Kraken X61
33
34
35
37
Prolimatech Genesis*
(2 x reference 140 mm fans)
35
36
37
39
Thermalright Silver Arrow
35
38
40
Noctua NH-C14
36
37
39
41
Scythe Kotetsu
35
38
41
42
Thermalright HR-22*
(2 x reference 140 mm fans)
37
38
39
Swiftech H240-X
33
35
36
39
Noctua NH-D15
38
39
40
Scythe Mugen Max
38
39
43
Thermalright Archon SB-E
39
40
43
Phanteks PH-TC14PE
38
39
41
Thermalright HR-02 Macho
38
39
40
41
43
Scythe Mugen 4
40
42
45
Noctua NH-U14S
38
40
43
NZXT Kraken X41
38
Scythe Mugen Max
(dual reference 140 mm fans)
39
41
Be Quiet! Dark Rock Pro 3
39
40
44
49
NZXT Havik 140
39
41
Be Quiet! Shadow Rock Slim
40
41
42
Cryorig R1 Ultimate
37
41
42
Thermalright HR-22*
(reference 140 mm fan)
39
40
42
44
Scythe Yasya
40
43
Cogage TRUE Spirit 1366
41
43
46
Cryorig R1 Universal
39
41
Zalman CNPS10X Quiet
40
42
47
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus
41
44
54
SPL (dBA@1m)
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
Deepcool Maelstrom 240
40
41
45
46
Scythe Mugen Max
(reference 140 mm fan)
39
41
42
43
SilverStone Tundra TD03
40
Scythe Grand Kama Cross
40
41
44
49
Deepcool Gamer Storm Lucifer V2 (2 x reference 140 mm fans)
40
41
Cryorig H5 Universal
41
42
45 46
Deepcool Gamer Storm Lucifer V2 (reference 140 mm fan)
42
42
44
Scythe Ashura
42
44
Phanteks PH-TC12DX
41
44
Silverstone Argon AR03
41
43
48
SilverStone Argon AR01
42
44
50
Scythe Ninja 3
44
46
Titan Fenrir
43
45
47
Cooler Master Seidon 240M
40
43
53
Deepcool Gamer Storm Lucifer V2
41
43
45
49
SilverStone Heligon HE02*
(2 x reference 140 mm fans)
44
46
Antec Kühler H20 620
42
44
47
LEPA LV12
45
48
52
Zalman CNPS9900 MAX
45
47
49
NZXT Kraken X31
43
44
47
Enermax Liqtech 120X
44
45
SilverStone Heligon HE02*
(reference 140 mm fan)
45
46
48
50
GELID Tranquillo Rev.2
48
49
50
Be Quiet! Dark Rock 2
48
52
55
61
Zalman CNPS9900DF
48
50
53
GELID GX-7 Rev.2
49
51
56
Core i7-980X Stock Cooler
53
62
Enermax ETS-T40
49
55
64
Core i7-920 Stock Cooler
64
FAIL
SPL (dBA@1m)
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
Single/dual fan air-cooled heatsinks in light/dark green.
Single/dual fan liquid coolers in light/dark blue.
*Models that ship without a fan tested with reference fans.

The Mugen Max’s fine showing lands it in the top ten of our CPU cooler chart, roughly on par with the Noctua NH-D15 and Thermalright Archon SB-E. The stock fan seems to be one of the keys to its success as it outperforms even the dual reference fan configuration.

A 5~6°C deficit compared to the Mugen Max at similar noise levels is enough to drop the Lucifer V2 to the bottom third of our chart. However, if you lose the weak fan in favor of our reference model, its performance perks up enough to upgrade it to a more middling position. It is a significant improvement on the SilverStone Heligon HE02 though, the only heatsink we’ve tested with a similar shape/body. This is primarily due to the V2’s far superior base/heatspreader contact.

Test Results: Passive Cooling

While the Deepcool Lucifer V2 ships with a fan, it’s obviously designed with passive cooling in mind. Thus, some fanless testing is in order.

Passive Cooler Performance: CPU Thermal Rise
(Core i5-2400 @ 3.6 GHz, 1.3V, Prime95)
Time Elapsed
Deepcool Lucifer V2
NoFan CR-80EH
NoFan CR-95C Copper
Start
4°C
5°C
4°C
5 mins
51°C
70°C
50°C
10 mins
69°C
74°C
53°C
15 mins
74°C
76°C
54°C
20 mins
76°C
78°C
25 mins
78°C
>30 mins
79°C

On our less demanding small heatsink test platform with an overclocked/overvolted Core i5-2400, the Lucifer V2 produces a barely stable result, edged out slightly by the recently reviewed NoFan CR-80EH. It finishes this test with a CPU thermal rise of 79°C though, just 1~2°C before the processor begins to throttle. The ambient temperature in our lab is typically between 19°C and 22°C; In a slightly warmer environment, it would fail this test.

Passive Cooler Comparison: CPU Thermal Rise
(Core i7-965 @ 3.2 GHz, 1.2V, Prime95, half load)
Time Elapsed
SilverStone Heligon HE02
Thermalright HR-22
Deepcool Lucifer V2
NoFan CR-95C Copper
Start
14°C
14°C
14°C
15°C
4 mins
54°C
46°C
46°C
55°C
8 mins
73°C
61°C
57°C
60°C
10 mins
FAIL
68°C
64°C
61°C
12 mins
N/A
75°C
69°C
62°C
14 mins
FAIL
73°C
16 mins
N/A
77°C
18 mins
FAIL

Our large heatsink test platform, even on half load, is more taxing. The Lucifer V2 fails this test after 18 minutes, though it does manage to hang on longer than the SilverStone HE02 and Thermalright HR-22, which are also billed as fanless solutions.

MP3 SOUND RECORDINGS

These recordings were made with a high
resolution, lab quality, digital recording system
inside SPCR’s
own 11 dBA ambient anechoic chamber
, then converted to LAME 128kbps
encoded MP3s. We’ve listened long and hard to ensure there is no audible degradation
from the original WAV files to these MP3s. They represent a quick snapshot of
what we heard during the review.

These recordings are intended to give you an idea of how the product sounds
in actual use — one meter is a reasonable typical distance between a computer
or computer component and your ear. The recording contains stretches of ambient
noise that you can use to judge the relative loudness of the subject. Be aware
that very quiet subjects may not be audible — if we couldn’t hear it from
one meter, chances are we couldn’t record it either!

The recording starts with 5 second segments of room ambiance, then the fan
at various levels. For the most realistic results, set the volume so that
the starting ambient level is just barely audible, then don’t change the volume
setting again.

  • Scythe Mugen Max stock fan at 1m
    — at 50% PWM, 590 RPM (13 dBA)
    — at 55% PWM, 700 RPM (16 dBA)
    — at 60% PWM, 810 RPM (20 dBA)
    — at 65% PWM, 940 RPM (25~26 dBA)
    — at 100% PWM, 1300 RPM (32 dBA)
  • Deepcool Gamer Storm Lucifer V2 stock fan at 1m
    — at 45 PWM, 580 RPM (13 dBA)
    — at 50% PWM, 720 RPM (16 dBA)
    — at 55% PWM, 830 RPM (19 dBA)
    — at 60% PWM, 930 RPM (21~22 dBA)
    — at 65% PWM, 1020 RPM (25 dBA)
    — at 100% PWM, 1360 RPM (34 dBA)

FINAL THOUGHTS

Scythe Mugen Max

The Mugen Max offers excellent cooling proficiency, and in fact is the most effective asymmetric heatsink we’ve tested with a single fan. Physically, it’s height is standard for a tower cooler and has a lopsided design, giving it an edge in compatibility against much of the competition. Additionally, the fan is strong performer with above average acoustics.

Overall, this is the most well-rounded CPU heatsink we’ve examined in some time. There’s nothing to complain about, except perhaps that it doesn’t outshine the wunderkind that is the Scythe Kotetsu. Even the price is very reasonable at US$50, much less than other manufacturers are charging for their elite cooling solutions.

Deepcool Lucifer V2

In 2012, I reviewed the SilverStone Heligon HE02, a similar big tower designed for fanless operation. Unfortunately it was a disappointment due to poor contact between the heatsink base and the CPU heatspreader. Thankfully, the Lucifer V2 doesn’t suffer from this issue, becoming the cooler the HE02 should have been. Of all the traditionally designed tower heatsinks we’ve tested that tout fanless potential, the Lucifer V2 is the most successful, performing on par with the NoFan CR-80EH. Incidentally, NoFan specifies a thermal limit of 80W for the CR-80EH, while Deepcool is silent on the matter.

The included fan is definitely a weak point, but even with a superior fan, its proficiency with direct airflow is lackluster. If you’re looking to run a standard heatsink/fan combination, there are a multitude of stronger coolers out there that don’t take up nearly as much space as the expansive V2. The stock fan is more of a backup plan in case it can’t handle passive operation, as the heatsink’s design obviously isn’t optimized for active cooling. The V2 is quite tall as well, measuring 16.3 cm from top to bottom, which might be an issue for some smaller/narrower cases.

From a practical standpoint, I’m not a proponent of passive cooling but if you’re interested in a fanless operation, the Lucifer V2 is certainly one of the better options available. I do prefer the much smaller and lighter NoFan CR-80EH but it appears to be unavailable to North American retail channels. The V2 is a solid alternative that can be purchased for US$55 at Newegg.

Our thanks to Scythe
for the Mugen Max and Deepcool for the Lucifer V2 CPU cooler samples.

* * *


Scythe Mugen Max wins the SPCR’s Editor’s Choice Award


Deepcool Lucifer V2 is Recommended by SPCR

SPCR Articles of Related Interest:

Deepcool Gamer Storm Maelstrom 240 AIO Liquid Cooler
Be Quiet! Dark Rock Pro 3 & Cryorig H5 Universal Coolers
NoFan CR-80EH & CS-60 Fanless Cooler & Case
Phanteks PH-TC14S & Cryorig C1 CPU Coolers
Cryorig R1 Ultimate & Universal CPU Coolers
Swiftech H240-X CPU Liquid Cooling Kit

* * *

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