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Titan Fenrir & Coolermaster Hyper 212 Plus: Direct Touch Revisited

The Titan Fenrir and Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus are CPU heatsinks with direct touch/contact heatpipes. The Fenrir with its thicker heatpipes and larger body seems to have the advantage, but the slimmer Hyper 212 Plus may be the David to its Goliath.

May 9, 2010 by Lawrence Lee

Product
Titan Fenrir
(X’Mas Edition)

TTC-NK85TZ/CS(RB)
CPU Cooler
Cooler Master
Hyper 212 Plus

RR-B10-212P-G1
CPU
Cooler
Manufacturer
Titan
Technology
Cooler
Master
Street Price
US$50 US$30

For the past 5 years, the highest performing air cooled CPU heatsinks have
all been based on a heatpipe/tower design. Manufacturers have experimented with
the shape, fin spacing, number of heatpipes and nickel plating, but nothing
fundamental has changed since their debut except for direct touch heatpipes.
Direct touch involves flattening the heatpipes at the bottom of the heatsink
and having them form the actual base rather than an intermediary material (usually
a copper plate) to transfer the heat from the CPU and pass it onto the heatpipes.

The first direct touch coolers we tested, the
Xigmatek HDT-S1283 and HDT-SD964
were very strong performers even though
they were significantly smaller than the competition. Since then the technology
has become more common with bigger companies like OCZ and Cooler Master adopting
it in many of their heatsinks. Given their rising popularity, we felt it apt
to investigate a pair of more recent models, the Titan Fenrir and the Cooler
Master Hyper 212 Plus.

TITAN FENRIR

If you are unfamiliar with Titan, we don’t blame you as they are mainly an
OEM cooling solution provider. They are much smaller in the retail space and
Titan branded products are not well-known in North America. The name “Fenrir”
is that of a fierce wolf hailing from ancient Norse mythology; it’s an apt moniker
for this formidable-looking CPU heatsink.

The Titan Fenrir is the first product to be reviewed in direct response
to user donations
. This is a program which enables SPCR readers to vote
and donate funds for reviews of products of specific interest to them. For
more details, please see the forum Donate
for Reviews
.

 


The box.

Typically we do not take time to discuss a product’s packaging, but we would
be doing a great disservice not to mention that the Fenrir ships in one of those
loathsome sealed plastic clamshell containers that are notoriously difficult
to open.


Unboxed.

Inside is more plastic in the form of two trays holding the heatsink and an
attention-seeking chrome-painted 120 mm fan. The standard Fenrir has blasé
silver/gray fins, but our sample was an “X’Mas Edition” with fins
painted blood red and pitch black, a far-from-festive color scheme. Titan is
based in Taiwan, which has a little known, but incredibly macabre Christmas
tradition. A white box holds the mounting hardware, thermal compound, fan clips,
and a 4-pin PWM to 3-pin adapter with an in-line resistor to slow down the fan.
The Fenrir supports all of Intel’s current desktop sockets, but the package
lacks a backplate for LGA1156.


Accessories.

 

Titan Fenrir: Key Features
(from the product
web page
)
Feature & Brief Our Comment
4 x 8mm heatpipes with Heat Pipe Direct
Contact feature: rapid heat conductivity and draw heat away from CPU immediately
The use of four, thick heatpipes may
be overkill.
12cm giant fan : comprehensive cooling +
superior silent performance at 17dBA only
12 cm isn’t giant by today’s standards
and 17 dBA is nowhere near silent — “quiet” would have been
a better adjective.
PWM intelligent controller: automatically
adjust fan to provide wonderful balance
between performance and rumble generated from CPU
The fan itself does not appear to have
a controller. We believe this comment refers to the PWM feature in general.
High density fin design: maximize cooling
areas for overclocking
More fins doesn’t always translate into
better cooling. Low speed fans have difficulty cooling denser heatsinks.
Universal support: compatible with Intel
LGA 775, LGA1156, LGA1366 and AMD K8, AM2, AM2+, AM3
As we noted before, all sockets are supported
but there is no LGA1156 backplate included.

 

Titan Fenrir: Specifications
(from the product
web page
)
Outline Dimension 124 x 107 x 156 mm
Fan Dimension 120 x 120 x 25 mm
Rated Voltage 12V DC
Rated Current 0.32 A
Power Consumption 3.84 W
Rated Speed 800 ~ 2150 ± 10% RPM
Airflow 33.20 ~ 78.41 CFM
Static Pressure 0.02 ~ 0.11 Inch H2O
Noise Level < 17.2 ~ < 39 dBA
Bearing Type Sleeve / One Ball & One Sleeve / Two
Ball / Z-AXIS
Life Time 25,000 / 35,000 / 50,000 / 60,000 Hours

COOLER MASTER HYPER 212 PLUS

Cooler Master is a PC hardware giant that requires little introduction. The
brand has a wide array of cooling solutions, but its heatsinks have generally
fared rather poorly in the past in our tests. The Hyper 212 Plus heatsink hopes
to reverse this trend, though it seems to be at a disadvantage compared to the
Fenrir. Its body is much thinner and the heatpipes aren’t as thick, 6 mm vs.
8 mm. The original Hyper 212 has a traditional copper base but looks very similar
to the Plus — be careful not to mix up the two.


The box next to an Intel LGA1156 stock cooler.


Unboxed.

Cooler Master’s packaging is more economical and environmentally friendly
than the Fenrir’s, though we would prefer if it had no plastic at all. Along
with the mounting hardware that accommodates all current AMD and Intel sockets,
there are brackets, pads, and screws to mount a second fan. Note that our sample’s
model number is RR-B10-212P-G1; there is a second version, the RR-B10-212P-GP
that uses wire clips to mount the fan, and it does not come with a second set
of wire clips.

Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus: Key Features
(from the product
web page
)
Feature & Brief Our Comment
Computer aided heatsink design provides
fin optimization with perfect balance between high and low speed operation.
Okay.
4 x Direct Contact heat-pipes for seamless
contact between CPU surface and cooler.
Okay.
Wide-range PWM fan with unique blade design
for excellent airflow.
The fan is odd in that its blades are
twisted.
Upgradable to dual fans with newly developed
“QuickSnap” fan brackets for easy installation. (brackets for
2nd fan included)
Nice addition.
Versatile all-in-one mounting solution
for Intel Socket LGA775/1156/1366 and AMD Socket AM2/AM2+/AM3.
Full socket support.
Silent operation with minimal noise level
at 13 dBA.
Presumably at minimum speed.
Excellent airflow design with compact heatsink
dimension
The Hyper 212 Plus is small for a modern
high performance heatsink, weighing just over a pound without the fan.

 

Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus: Specifications
(from the product
web page
)
CPU Socket Intel: LGA1366 / 1156 / 775

AMD: AM3 / AM2+ / AM2

CPU Support Intel:
Core™ i7 Extreme / Core™ i7 / Core™ i5 / Core™ i3 /
Core™2 Extreme / Core™2 Quad / Core™2 Duo / Pentium / CeleronAMD
Phenom™ II X4 / Phenom™ II X3 / Phenom™ II X2 / Phenom™
X4 / Phenom™ X3 / Athlon™ II X4 / Athlon™ II X3 / Athlon™
II X2 / Athlon™ X2 / Athlon™ / Sempron™
Dimension 120 x 79.7 x 158.5 mm (L x W x H)
Weight 626g
Heat Sink Material Aluminum fin / 4 heat pipes
Fan Dimension 120 x 120 x 25 mm
Fan Speed 600 – 2000 R.P.M. (PWM)
Fan Airflow 21.2 – 76.8 CFM
Fan Air Pressure 0.40 – 3.90 mmH2O
Bearing Type Long life sleeve
Fan Life Expectancy 40,000 hours
Fan Noise Level (dB-A) 13 – 32 dBA
Connector 4-pin

TITAN FENRIR: PHYSICAL DETAILS

The Fenrir features 4 direct touch/contact heatpipes and 50 anodized
aluminum fins in total. It measures 124 x 107 x 156 mm (W x D x H) and weighs
about 610 grams, 740 grams with the stock fan and wire clips attached.


The heatpipes are big, 8 mm thick and form a simple “U”-shape
with two straight rows at the ends.


On average, the fins are about 0.36 mm thick and spaced 1.78 mm apart.


From the top you can see the Fenrir is a fairly thick cooler.


The four heatpipes are separated by the base plate for structural reasons.
Most copper heatpipes are not that strong/thick and thus require reinforcement.


The two heatpipes at the center of our sample were already tarnished when
we removed the protective plastic sheet. The base was flat but there were
some semicircular marks left over from the milling process.

TITAN FENRIR: INSTALLATION

The most critical aspect of installation is for the heatsink to
be securely mounted. The more firmly it is installed, the better the contact
between the heatsink’s base and the CPU itself. It’s also less likely to fall
off. Ease of installation is also important — a simple mounting scheme
means less time spent installing, and a reduced likelihood of screwing up.


Like many large heatsinks, the first step is to attach a backplate
on the underside of the motherboard. The LGA1366 backplate has long bolts
permanently affixed. The bolts have very short threads at the top for
the nuts to screw onto.


The other sockets require you to construct your own bolts using screws
and large brass standoffs. The board goes between the black and white
washers.


The mounting frame fits over the base plate of the cooler in a “T”-shaped
groove. The frame cannot be rotated, so the face of the heatsink points
upward on AMD motherboards.


On the mounting frame there is a single elongated hole on each corner
used for both LGA1156 and LGA1366 installations . This makes mounting
the heatsink a bit difficult as the bolts can bend and move slightly as
the nuts are secured. The nuts are capped so you cannot over-tighten them.


We mounted the Fenrir several times trying to get it on as evenly and
securely as possible, but it always tightened more on one side that the
other. As a result, there was slightly limited contact at one end. The
thermal compound footprint also shows that the heatpipes are bigger than
they need to be. Note that during testing we added more thermal compound
between the pipes to fill the gaps; the above picture just illustrates
the mounting problem.


Fully mounted with the stock fan secured. The wire clips have handles
at the center, though they would’ve been more useful at the top and bottom
where the tension is greatest.

COOLER MASTER HYPER 212 PLUS: PHYSICAL DETAILS

The Hyper 212 Plus features 4 direct touch/contact heatpipes and
57 aluminum fins in total. It measures 120 x 79.7 x 159.5 mm (W x D x H) and
weighs about 470 grams, 640 grams with the stock fan and plastic brackets attached.


On average, the Hyper 212 Plus’ fins are 0.43 mm thick and spaced 1.54
mm apart, very densely packed compared to most heatsinks. The heatpipes
are staggered to dissipate heat more effectively and to catch more airflow.


The body is thin, only about 5 cm deep without the fan.


There are two deep grooves running down the face of the body on each side,
though we’re not sure exactly why. For the most part, the structure is
a simple rectangular box.


The base is flat with some light machine marks.


Two plastic brackets screwed to each side of the fan are used to mount
it to the heatsink. Small rubber pads are placed over the screws to dampen
the fan.

COOLER MASTER HYPER 212 PLUS: INSTALLATION

The most critical aspect of installation is for the heatsink to
be securely mounted. The more firmly it is installed, the better the contact
between the heatsink’s base and the CPU itself. It’s also less likely to fall
off. Ease of installation is also important — a simple mounting scheme
means less time spent installing, and a reduced likelihood of screwing up.

Installation is a fairly simple process beginning with threading
large steel standoffs through the backplate from the top side of the board
using the provided nut driver.


On the back side, nuts are used to secure the standoffs and backplate.


An ingenious “X” shaped mounting bracket is placed over the
base that snaps into two different positions, one with equal-distant arms
for Intel sockets, and the other to match the rectangular layout of AM2/AM3
sockets. To move the bolts between the LGA775, LGA1156, and LGA1366 positions
you simply compress the springs and slide them into the correct hole.


The four bolts are secured to the standoffs and the fan is snapped on.


The resulting thermal compound footprint shows the base is almost perfect
in size for a LGA1366 heatspreader. The compound also left less of a “snowflake”
pattern compared to the Fenrir, indicating a tighter mount.

TESTING

Before thermal testing, we took some basic physical measurements.

Approximate Physical Measurements
Heatsink Titan Fenrir Coolermaster Hyper 212+
Weight
610 g
740 g with fan and clips
470 g
640 with fan and brackets
Fin count 50 57
Fin thickness
0.36 mm 0.43
Fin spacing
1.78 mm 1.54 mm
Vertical Clearance
42 mm (from the motherboard
PCB to the bottom fin)
42 mm (from the motherboard
PCB to the bottom fin)
Horizontal Overhang (+/-)
20 mm (far edge
of the heatsink to the top edge of the motherboard PCB)
-25 mm (far edge of the
heatsink to the top edge of the motherboard PCB)

 

Comparison: Approximate Fin Thickness & Spacing
Heatsink
Fin Thickness
Fin Spacing
Scythe Ninja 2
0.39 mm
3.68 mm
Thermalright HR-01 Plus
0.45 mm
3.15 mm
Noctua NH-U12P
0.44 mm
2.63 mm
Noctua NH-C12P
0.47 mm
2.54 mm
Thermolab Baram
0.44 mm
2.52 mm
Noctua NH-D14
0.43 mm
2.33 mm
Prolimatech Armageddon
0.51 mm
2.08 mm
Prolimatech Megahalems
0.50 mm
2.00 mm
Zalman CNPS10X Quiet
0.40 mm
2.00 mm
Xigmatek HDT-S1283
0.33 mm
1.96 mm
Scythe Kabuto & Zipang 2
0.34 mm
1.94 mm
Scythe Mugen-2
0.31 mm
1.89 mm
Cooler Master V8
0.30 mm
~1.85 mm
ZEROtherm Nirvana
0.43 mm
1.82 mm
ZEROtherm Zen
0.37 mm
1.80 mm
Titan Fenrir
0.36 mm
1.78 mm
Cogage TRUE Spirit 1366
0.40 mm
1.70 mm
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus
0.43 mm
1.54 mm
Zalman CNPS10X Extreme
0.42 mm
1.50 mm
Thermalright Ultra-120
0.45 mm
1.42 mm

Testing was done on our
new i7-1366 heatsink testing platform
. A summary of the test system
and procedure follows.

Key Components in Heatsink Test Platform:

  • Intel Core i7-965 Extreme
    Nehalem core, LGA1366, 3.2GHz, 45nm, 130W TDP.
  • Asus
    P6X58D Premium
    ATX motherboard. X58 chipset.
  • Asus
    EAH3450 Silent
    graphics card.
  • Intel
    X25-M
    80GB 2.5″ solid-state drive. Chosen for silence.
  • 3GB QiMonda
    DDR3 memory. 3 x 1GB DDR3-1066 in triple channel..
  • Seasonic X-650 SS-650KM
    650W ATX power supply. This PSU is semi-passively cooled. At the power levels
    of our test platform, its fan does not spin.
  • Arctic Silver
    Lumière
    : Special fast-curing thermal interface material, designed
    specifically for test labs.
  • Nexus 120 fan (part of our standard testing methodology; used when
    possible with heatsinks that fit 120x25mm fans)

The system is silent under the test conditions, except for the CPU cooling
fan(s).

Normally, our reference fan is used whenever possible, the measured details
of which are shown below.

Reference Nexus 120mm fan
Anechoic chamber measurements
Voltage
SPL@1m
Speed
12V
16 dBA
1100 RPM
9V
13 dBA
890 RPM
7V
12 dBA
720 RPM
5V
11 dBA
530 RPM

Measurement and Analysis Tools

  • Extech 380803 AC power analyzer / data logger for measuring AC system
    power.
  • Custom-built, four-channel variable DC power supply, used to regulate
    the fan speed during the test.
  • PC-based spectrum analyzer:
    SpectraPlus with ACO Pacific mic and M-Audio digital
    audio interfaces.
  • Anechoic chamber
    with ambient level of 11 dBA or lower
  • Various other tools for testing fans, as documented in our
    standard fan testing methodology
    .
  • SpeedFan,
    used to monitor the on-chip thermal sensors. The sensors are not calibrated,
    so results are not universally applicable. The hottest core reading is used.
  • Prime95,
    used to stress the CPU heavily, generating more heat than most real applications.
    8 instances are used to ensure that all 4 cores (with Hyper-threading) are
    stressed.
  • CPU-Z,
    used to monitor the CPU speed to determine when overheating occurs.
  • Thermometers to measure the air temperature around the test platform
    and near the intake of the heatsink fan.

Noise measurements are made with the fans powered from the lab’s variable DC
power supply while the rest of the system was off to ensure that system noise
did not skew the measurements.

Load testing was accomplished using Prime95 to stress the processor, and the
graph function in SpeedFan was used to ensure that the load temperature is stable
for at least ten minutes. The temperature recorded is the highest single core
reading. The stock fans were tested at various voltages to represent a good
cross-section of airflow and noise performance.

The ambient conditions during testing were 10~11 dBA and 21~23°C.

TEST RESULTS

Stock Fan Measurements: Titan Fenrir

The stock fan, despite its chrome painted blades, looks a bit on the anemic

Stock Fan Specifications
Manufacturer
Power Rating
3.84 W
Model Number
TFD-12025H12ZP
Airflow Rating
78.41 CFM
Bearing Type
Z-Axis?
RPM Rating
2150 RPM
Corners
Open
Noise Rating
39 dBA
Frame Size
120 x 120 x 25 mm
Header Type
4-pin PWM
Fan Blade Diameter
110 mm
Starting Voltage
~ 3.8 V
Hub Size
43 mm
Weight
130 g
Data in green cells provided by the manufacturer
or observed; data in the blue cells were measured.

side. The blades are small, particularly near the hub, and don’t have much curvature.
The specifications list multiple bearing types, though the “Z” in
the model number suggests it uses a mysterious bearing type called “Z-Axis.”

Stock Fan Measurements
Voltage
Speed
SPL @1m
12V
2110 RPM
35~36 dBA
9V
1690 RPM
28~29 dBA
7V
1310 RPM
21 dBA
6V
1100 RPM
17~18 dBA
5V
910 RPM
14~15 dBA
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from
the intake side of the fan.
Ambient noise level: 11 dBA.

The Fenrir’s stock fan whines and buzzes terribly at full speed, but thankfully
it undervolts well. At 9V, the noise level is still unbearable but it sounds
much smoother and noticeably less whiny. At 7V it begins to hum slightly, but
this too dissipates as the fan speed is turned down. At 6V and below, it is
very smooth and quiet.

For users with motherboards that do not control the fan speed, PWM or otherwise,
there is an included 4-pin to 3-pin adapter that can be used to slow the fan
to about 1130 RPM, or the equivalent of 7V. It’s not enough to make the fan
quiet by SPCR standards, but it’s better than nothing.


At 6V, the Fenrir’s fan is quiet and has a benign acoustic profile.

Stock Fan Measurements: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus

The Cooler Master fan is far more intriguing unit with curved struts, a thick

Stock Fan Specifications
Manufacturer
Power Rating
4.32 W
Model Number
A12025-20CB-4BP-C1
Airflow Rating
76.8 CFM
Bearing Type
Sleeve
RPM Rating
2000 RPM
Corners
Open
Noise Rating
32 dBA
Frame Size
120 x 120 x 25 mm
Header Type
4-pin PWM
Fan Blade Diameter
114 mm
Starting Voltage
~ 4.6 V
Hub Size
47 mm
Weight
150 g
Data in green cells provided by the manufacturer
or observed; data in the blue cells were measured.

hub, and twisted blades. Though the model number is not the same, it appears
to be the Blade
Master 120 mm fan
, as the appearance and specifications are identical.

Stock Fan Measurements
Voltage
Speed
SPL @1m
12V
2050 RPM
32~33 dBA
10V
1540 RPM
24 dBA
9V
1240 RPM
18 dBA
8V
920 RPM
13 dBA
7V
630 RPM
12 dBA
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from
the intake side of the fan.
Ambient noise level: 11 dBA.

Like most stock fans, the Blade Master is loud and turbulent at full speed.
It is very buzzy at 10V, and generates an audible hum as well as bearing chatter
at 9V. It becomes quiet at about 8V, though its acoustic character remains the
same as at 9V. At 7V it is effectively inaudible at one meter, but at closer
distances it continues to hum in a fluttery manner as if the fan is slightly
off-balance.


The Hyper 212 Plus stock fan becomes quiet at 8V.

COOLING RESULTS

Titan Fenrir w/ stock 120 mm fan
Fan Voltage
SPL@1m
Temp
°C Rise
12V
35~36 dBA
61°C
39
9V
28~29 dBA
62°C
40
7V
21 dBA
65°C
43
6V
17~18 dBA
67°C
45
5V
14~15 dBA
69°C
47
Titan Fenrir w/ ref. 120 mm fan
12V
16 dBA
65°C
43
9V
13 dBA
68°C
46
7V
12 dBA
72°C
50
Load Temp: Prime95 for ~10 mins.
°C Rise: Temperature rise above ambient (22°C) at load.

At reasonable noise levels, the thermal rise for the Fenrir was between 43
and 47°C which is a tad on the high side. Our reference Nexus fan fared
much better, generating the same CPU temperature at 12V/16 dBA as the stock
fan at 7V/21 dBA. At 9V, it was 1°C cooler and 1~2 dBA quieter than the
Fenrir fan at 5V.

Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus w/ stock 120 mm fan
Fan Voltage
SPL@1m
Temp
°C Rise
12V
32~33 dBA
58°C
37
10V
24 dBA
60°C
39
9V
18 dBA
62°C
41
8V
13 dBA
65°C
44
7V
12 dBA
75°C
54
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus w/ ref. 120 mm fan
12V
16 dBA
62°C
41
9V
13 dBA
65°C
44
7V
12 dBA
69°C
48
Load Temp: Prime95 for ~10 mins.
°C Rise: Temperature rise above ambient (21°C) at load.

The Hyper 212 Plus was the more proficient cooler of the two, running 3~4°C
cooler than the Fenrir at equivalent or lower noise levels. However, when the
airflow was reduced to very low levels, the temperature skyrocketed. At 7V,
the CPU was operating 10°C hotter than at 8V, despite only a 1 dB drop in
SPL. The Hyper 212 Plus’ extremely tight fin spacing is likely to blame, though
it should be noted our reference fan suffered only a 4°C reduction in cooling
efficiency at equivalent levels.

Comparison Chart

°C rise Comparison
Heatsink
Nexus 120mm fan voltage /
SPL @1m
12V
9V
7V
16 dBA
13 dBA
12 dBA
Prolimatech Megahalems
38
41
44
Noctua NH-D14
38
42
45
Noctua NH-U12P
39
42
44
Scythe Mugen-2
39
42
45
Cogage TRUE Spirit 1366
40
42
45
Prolimatech Armageddon
40
42
46
Zalman CNPS10X Quiet
40
43
46
Thermalright U120 eXtreme
40
43
48
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus
41
44
48
Thermalright U120
42
45
49
Titan Fenrir
43
46
50
Noctua NH-C12P
43
47
51
Zalman CNPS10X Extreme
43
47
53
Zalman CNPS10X Flex
45
50
54
Cooler Master V8
46
50
54
Scythe Kabuto
51
53
60

The Hyper 212 Plus is in good company, landing right between two former champions,
the Thermalright Ultra-120
and eXtreme, and
only 3~4°C from the current leader, the Prolimatech
Megahalems
. The Fenrir is no slouch either, trailing the Cooler Master
by only a couple of degrees, but it’s a huge disappointing result when you consider
the Fenrir’s size. It should outperform the Hyper 212 Plus, with bigger
heatpipes and larger fins, but it just doesn’t.

MP3 SOUND RECORDINGS

These recordings were made with a high
resolution, lab quality, digital recording system
inside SPCR’s
own 11 dBA ambient anechoic chamber
, then converted to LAME 128kbps
encoded MP3s. We’ve listened long and hard to ensure there is no audible degradation
from the original WAV files to these MP3s. They represent a quick snapshot of
what we heard during the review.

These recordings are intended to give you an idea of how the product sounds
in actual use — one meter is a reasonable typical distance between a computer
or computer component and your ear. The recording contains stretches of ambient
noise that you can use to judge the relative loudness of the subject. Be aware
that very quiet subjects may not be audible — if we couldn’t hear it from
one meter, chances are we couldn’t record it either!

The recording starts with 5~10 second segments of room ambiance, then the fan
at various levels. For the most realistic results, set the volume so that
the starting ambient level is just barely audible, then don’t change the volume
setting again.

FINAL THOUGHTS

Titan Fenrir (X’Mas Edition)

The X’Mas edition of the Titan Fenrir looks like a formidable CPU cooler with
a morbid red and black paint job, shiny stock fan, and fat direct-touch heatpipes,
but its bark is much bigger than its bite. It has a decent sounding fan that
undervolts well, but its performance is somewhat lacking compared to the competition.
Its biggest problem seems to be a mounting system that doesn’t apply enough
pressure. The thickness of its fin may also harm cooling efficiency with a low
speed fa. The thick heatpipes don’t make full contact with the CPU heatspreader,
though we’re not sure if two halves of a heatpipe are better or worse than one
full heatpipe when it comes to thermal conduction. In addition, the fan blows
upwards when installed on AMD motherboards, and the package lacks a backplate
for LGA1156. Thankfully the Fenrir is not particularly expensive by modern standards,
retailing for US$50, though compared to the Hyper 212 Plus, its value is decidedly
poor.

Titan Fenrir (X’Mas Edition)
PROS

* Good performance
* Stock fan has above average acoustics

CONS

* Questionable mounting system
* Blows upward on AMD motherboards, no LGA1156 backplate

Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus

The Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus, despite being lighter, thinner, and having
smaller heatpipes, is a better overall heatsink than the Fenrir. The mounting
system is clever, requiring only one set of hardware for all sockets, and installs
on AMD boards in the ‘proper’ orientation with the fan blowing east-west. We
believe the superior mount also gives it an edge in performance, though only
in the range of 2~3°C on our test setup. While the stock fan is acoustically
poor, the cost of replacing the fan is acceptable when you consider the Hyper
212 Plus can be found for a shade under US$30 at various online shops. It even
ships with a second set of fan brackets, something many pricier coolers lack.
The Hyper 212 Plus is difficult to beat for value; it’s one of the most cost-effective
CPU heatsinks we’ve tested to date.

Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus
PROS

* Good performance
* Versatile, secure mounting system
* Relatively small size
* Hardware for second fan included
* Very low price

CONS

* Stock fan has poor acoustics

* * *

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